The Original Gangster Marlon Brando dead at 80

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alexalonso
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The Original Gangster Marlon Brando dead at 80

Unread postby alexalonso » July 3rd, 2004, 6:23 pm

From the Godfather mr Brando is dead at the age of 80, had a long career.

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Re: The Original Gangster Marlon Brando dead at 80

Unread postby Ms. Nisi » July 3rd, 2004, 6:53 pm

Yeah I heard about this. It was all over the news yesterday. And just the day before that they were on the news talking about how much he was in debt.
R.I.P.

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Re: The Original Gangster Marlon Brando dead at 80

Unread postby T~ » July 3rd, 2004, 7:11 pm

alonso wrote:From the Godfather mr Brando is dead at the age of 80, had a long career.
How did he die?

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Re: The Original Gangster Marlon Brando dead at 80

Unread postby Ms. Nisi » July 3rd, 2004, 8:44 pm

^^^^Reports say that his death is unknown at this time.

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Re: The Original Gangster Marlon Brando dead at 80

Unread postby Ms. Nisi » July 3rd, 2004, 8:46 pm

Marlon Brandon passes away

Jul 3, 2004

Marlon Brando, the reclusive Oscar-winning actor who was one of the most influential stage and screen performers of his generation, has died at age 80, associates said on Friday.

The cause of death was not immediately known. Media reports citing family friends and Brando's lawyer said he died at a Los Angeles area hospital on Thursday. His agents, citing Brando's long-held desire for privacy, confirmed his death but declined to give details.

With his broken nose and rebellious nature, Brando established a more naturalistic style of acting and defined American macho for a generation with classic performances in "A Streetcar Named Desire" (1951), "The Wild One" (1953) and "On the Waterfront" (1954).

Francis Ford Coppola, who directed Brando in "Apocalypse Now," said: "Marlon would hate the idea of people chiming in to give their comments about his death. All I'll say is that it makes me sad he's gone."

To many, Brando remained the motorcycle-riding rebel he played in "The Wild One." Asked what he was rebelling against, Brando replied, "Whaddya got?"

Brando won an Academy Award for "On the Waterfront" and another for his brooding, at times mumbling, portrayal of the patriarch of a Mafia family in "The Godfather" (1972).

But Brando also railed against Hollywood and chafed at the pomp of stardom throughout a stormy career. In 1973, he refused to accept his second Oscar to protest the treatment of American Indians and later professed not to know what had happened to the award.

In more recent years, Brando's brilliance as an actor was overshadowed by his eccentric reclusiveness, the turmoil in his family life and financial disputes.

Christian Brando, his son by his first wife, Welsh actress Anna Kashfi, was sentenced to 10 years in prison for the 1990 murder of his half-sister Cheyenne's boyfriend. Cheyenne later committed suicide, in 1995, at the age of 25.

Brando, who was paid a then-staggering $US14 million for his walk-on performance in 1978's "Superman," remained enmeshed in legal disputes over money up until his final weeks.

He poured millions into Tetiaroa, a South Seas atoll he bought in 1966 and where he spent much of the 1980s living out a boyhood fascination with Tahiti rekindled during the shooting of "Mutiny on the Bounty."

He said he only made movies for the money. "Acting is an empty and useless profession," he said.

Still, Brando inspired a generation of rebel actors, including James Dean.

Brando was born on April 3, 1924, in Omaha, Nebraska, the son of a calcium carbonate salesman and an actress who coached a local drama group. He was sent to a Minnesota military academy but was soon expelled.

He headed to New York, where his two sisters were studying art and drama. There he took up drama, studying with famed teacher Stella Adler and the Actors' Studio.

In 1946, critics voted Brando Broadway's most promising actor for his role as a returning World War II veteran in the flop "Truckline Cafe."

Brando broke his nose in backstage horseplay and gained a reputation for being moody. Auditioning for a Noel Coward comedy, Brando tossed the script aside, saying, "Don't you know there are people in the world starving?"

In 1947, playwright Tennessee Williams approved selecting Brando to play the brutish Stanley Kowalski in the stage production of "A Streetcar Named Desire."

Brando resisted Hollywood until 1950, but then turned in memorable performances in Elia Kazan's 1951 film version of "Streetcar" and "Viva Zapata!" (1952), the story of a Mexican peasant revolutionary.

In the 1990s, Brando emerged from a decade hiatus to take small roles in minor films, often for outsized fees. He played a Godfather-like mafioso for laughs opposite Matthew Broderick "The Freshman," and his portrayal of a kindly psychiatrist in 1995's "Don Juan DeMarco," opposite Johnny Depp, earned him about $US3 million in a movie budgeted at $US15 million.

Brando was married three times, choosing little-known actresses as his brides -- Kashfi, Mexican actress Movita Castenada, and Tahitian Tarita Teriipia, who co-starred with him in "Mutiny on the Bounty."

"He's full of deep hostilities, longings, feelings of distrust," director Kazan once said of him, "But his outer front is gentle and nice."

[url]http://tvnz.co.nz/view/news_entertainment_story_skin/434061?format=html[/url]

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Re: The Original Gangster Marlon Brando dead at 80

Unread postby Casper » July 7th, 2004, 8:04 pm

RIP
Brando

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Re: The Original Gangster Marlon Brando dead at 80

Unread postby Kemosave » July 15th, 2004, 2:48 pm

He was a pretty good actor. Anyone remember Street A Car Named Desire?

But he wasn't no gangster.

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Re: The Original Gangster Marlon Brando dead at 80

Unread postby fistfullofboomstick » August 14th, 2004, 11:36 am

yeh man, i loved the godfather, too bad hes gone. right after he died i read an article that bashed him in one of the local papers, it was sad

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Re: The Original Gangster Marlon Brando dead at 80

Unread postby dopekid127 » August 14th, 2004, 4:20 pm

yeah..marlon brando was a good ass actor....of course everybody remember him in Godfather and Street Car name Desire....was he in debt really? i thought he owned an island?

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Unread postby exsdustynig » April 25th, 2006, 12:32 am

he wasnt a g

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Re: The Original Gangster Marlon Brando dead at 80

Unread postby grundy » May 28th, 2018, 8:14 am

Brando was a fag and a rapist


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