Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

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Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 12th, 2010, 7:43 am

The actions overnight by the Mexican government are unprecedented in their scope and importance. Never before has the United States received from Mexico such a large number of major drug defendants and other criminals for prosecution in this country, including Osiel Cardenas Guillen, the accused chief of the notorious Gulf Cartel. We recognize the bold stance of President Felipe Calderon and his government in targeting the drug-related violence and corruption that affects both our nations."

A listing of the individuals that the Mexican government extradited to the United States overnight is below.

1) Osiel (Oziel) Cardenas Guillen was indicted in the Southern District of Texas on charges of conspiring to possess with intent to distribute, and the distribution of large quantities of marijuana, and, further, with assaulting and threatening to murder an FBI agent, a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agent, and a local sheriff’s deputy who was working under the direction of the U.S. Customs Service (now called U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement). Cardenas is the leader of the notorious Gulf Cartel, headquartered in Matamoros, Mexico, and responsible for much of the hideous “narco-violence” at the Southwest border.

2) Ismael Higuera Guerrero, and

3) Gilberto Higuera Guerrero were indicted in the Southern District of California as co-defendants in the Arellano-Felix drug cartel case, for racketeering (RICO), drug trafficking and money laundering offenses. According to the indictment, Ismael served as a chief lieutenant and was responsible for the day-to-day operations of the cartel in Mexico, including the receipt of large shipments of cocaine and marijuana followed by the importation of those shipments into the U.S., and the collection of drug proceeds. Gilberto, according to the indictment, supervised the drug trafficking from Mexicali, Mexico, receiving shipments from Tijuana, Mexico, and elsewhere, importing those shipments into the U.S, and using kidnapping, torture, and murder to enforce the cartel’s work.

4) Consuelo Carreto Valencia was indicted in the Eastern District of New York in a trafficking in persons conspiracy, namely to smuggle Mexican women into the U.S. to engage in prostitution in New York City and elsewhere. The women were compelled by the use of physical violence, sexual assault, threats of harm and deception to engage in prostitution. The defendant is charged with conspiring to engage in sex trafficking, travel in aid of prostitution (the Mann Act), sex trafficking, forced labor, conspiring to import aliens for immoral purposes, and alien smuggling among other offenses.

5) Hector Palma Salazar was indicted in the Southern District of California in 1995 on charges of conspiring to distribute large quantities of cocaine.

6) Gilberto Salinas Doria was indicted in the Southern District of New York, along with the former Governor of the State of Quintana Roo in Mexico, with conspiring to import and conspiring to distribute more than 200 tons of cocaine into the U.S. for delivery to New York City.

7) Jose Alberto Marquez Esqueda was indicted in the Southern District of California as part of the Arellano-Felix drug trafficking organization, in conspiracies to import and distribute marijuana and cocaine. Jose Alberto “Bat” Marquez worked as an enforcer, bodyguard, and caretaker of the drug “stash” houses for the organization, according to the indictment.

8) Gracielo Gardea Carrasco was indicted along with 31 others in the Los Tres de la Sierra Organization, in the Western District of Texas, with the conspiracy to import and distribute marijuana and the importation and distribution of marijuana in the U.S. As alleged in the indictment, Gracielo Gardea Carrasco was primarily responsible for overseeing the importation and distribution of marijuana from Chihuahua, Mexico into Texas.

9) Miguel Angel Arriola Marquez was indicted in the District of Colorado with a conspiracy to import cocaine and a conspiracy to possess cocaine with intent to distribute, as well as with conspiring to launder millions of dollars which represented drug proceeds.

10) Alicia Gonzalez Cisneros was indicted in the Southern District of Texas (McAllen) on charges of conspiring to possess more than 1,000 kilograms of marijuana and the possession with the intent to distribute approximately 1,375 kilograms of marijuana.

11) Saul Saucedo Chaides was indicted in the District of Colorado with conspiracy to distribute narcotics, a conspiracy to import narcotics, and with narcotics-related money laundering.

12) Richard Matt is sought by the State of New York, town of North Tonawanda, for entering a home, kidnapping, then beating the occupant to death.

13) Carlos Villanueva Garcia was charged in a criminal information in the state of Washington (Franklin County) with murder in the second degree, namely by stabbing his landlord and thereby causing his death.

14) Efrain Gonzalez Cisneros was indicted in the Southern District of Texas (Corpus Christi) on charge of conspiracy with the intent to distribute large quantities of marijuana and the possession with intent to distribute large quantities of marijuana in 1999 and 2000.

15) Juan Ramon Morales Rodriguez was charged by the State of Texas (Ector County) with aggravated kidnapping of two children and the sexual assault of one of these children.

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thewestside
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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by thewestside » January 12th, 2010, 5:12 pm

I'm not sure I understand the title of this thread. The top guys in the Mexican cartels are not members of La Eme.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by youngspade » January 13th, 2010, 12:47 pm

thewestside wrote:I'm not sure I understand the title of this thread. The top guys in the Mexican cartels are not members of La Eme.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by youngspade » January 13th, 2010, 12:47 pm

thewestside wrote:I'm not sure I understand the title of this thread. The top guys in the Mexican cartels are not members of La Eme.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 14th, 2010, 1:12 am

thewestside wrote:I'm not sure I understand the title of this thread. The top guys in the Mexican cartels are not members of La Eme.
# 3 and #7 are both EME members -EL PALMA SALAZARs wife was killed by a hit squad contracted by the EME. Ive been tryint to reiterate how involved the EME is in world wide narcotics deals ,my previous posts show the most famous murders and most notorious murders of the 90s committed by the EME. BAT MARQUEZ was a suspect in a dozen homicides including the most famous murders of the catholic bishop and the murder of TJs police chief. #3 was in the top leadership spot of the Arellano Felix cartel. Another major figure was POPEYE ARAUZO a CDC verified EME member. POPEYE BARRON of course from my precious posts was an EME member he was at one time mexicos most wanted killer.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by youngspade » January 14th, 2010, 9:59 am

mayugastank wrote:
thewestside wrote:I'm not sure I understand the title of this thread. The top guys in the Mexican cartels are not members of La Eme.
# 3 and #7 are both EME members -EL PALMA SALAZARs wife was killed by a hit squad contracted by the EME. Ive been tryint to reiterate how involved the EME is in world wide narcotics deals ,my previous posts show the most famous murders and most notorious murders of the 90s committed by the EME. BAT MARQUEZ was a suspect in a dozen homicides including the most famous murders of the catholic bishop and the murder of TJs police chief. #3 was in the top leadership spot of the Arellano Felix cartel. Another major figure was POPEYE ARAUZO a CDC verified EME member. POPEYE BARRON of course from my precious posts was an EME member he was at one time mexicos most wanted killer.

What gangs were they in and who is # 3 and 7

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mnjmc » January 14th, 2010, 2:26 pm

mayugastank wrote:
thewestside wrote:I'm not sure I understand the title of this thread. The top guys in the Mexican cartels are not members of La Eme.
# 3 and #7 are both EME members -EL PALMA SALAZARs wife was killed by a hit squad contracted by the EME. Ive been tryint to reiterate how involved the EME is in world wide narcotics deals ,my previous posts show the most famous murders and most notorious murders of the 90s committed by the EME. BAT MARQUEZ was a suspect in a dozen homicides including the most famous murders of the catholic bishop and the murder of TJs police chief. #3 was in the top leadership spot of the Arellano Felix cartel. Another major figure was POPEYE ARAUZO a CDC verified EME member. POPEYE BARRON of course from my precious posts was an EME member he was at one time mexicos most wanted killer.
Wrong on many things. First and foremost El Guero Palma's wife was not killed by a hit squad of EME. It was a Venezuelan that creeped into his Guero's organization seduced his wife took her to away with her kids, he forced her to take millions from a bank account then killed her and chopped her head off. He then tooks Guero's kids and threw them over a bridge. The Venezuelan man was later arrested in Venezuela, and killed in prison. The story of what happened to Palma's wife is easy to find and it had nothing to do with EME.

#3 was definitely not an EME member and he wasn't even an important figure in the Arellano brothers organization. He was in charge of what little they had in Mexicali at the time. The Arellano's lost so much control over there that he eventually ended up working for el Mayo Zambada. And killing police chiefs in Mexico isn't really that big of a deal, happens all the time, you can't call that one of the most notorious murder of the 90s.

Again Bat was found in some stash house, not any special job, tweaked out. And when they caught him he held no high positions in AFO.

EME is not a factor of what is going on in Mexico with the cartel wars.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by thewestside » January 14th, 2010, 2:28 pm

mayugastank wrote:# 3 and #7 are both EME members -EL PALMA SALAZARs wife was killed by a hit squad contracted by the EME. Ive been tryint to reiterate how involved the EME is in world wide narcotics deals ,my previous posts show the most famous murders and most notorious murders of the 90s committed by the EME. BAT MARQUEZ was a suspect in a dozen homicides including the most famous murders of the catholic bishop and the murder of TJs police chief. #3 was in the top leadership spot of the Arellano Felix cartel. Another major figure was POPEYE ARAUZO a CDC verified EME member. POPEYE BARRON of course from my precious posts was an EME member he was at one time mexicos most wanted killer.
mnjmc basically said what I was going to above. Some Eme members doing hits or whatever for the Mexican cartels is one thing. But to say that the "biggest cartel figures" are Eme members is simply not true. And it's misleading.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by carlos22338 » January 14th, 2010, 5:48 pm

the eme needs to take over all the distribution of drugs in the US,and get all mexican gangs under one banner.they already did it in so cal getting mortal enemies to put away there difference.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by thewestside » January 14th, 2010, 6:55 pm

carlos22338 wrote:the eme needs to take over all the distribution of drugs in the US,and get all mexican gangs under one banner.they already did it in so cal getting mortal enemies to put away there difference.
That will never happen. Running things in prison and in Southern California is one thing. Taking over drug distribution throughout the country is something else. The cartels in Mexico run the show, not La Eme.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 15th, 2010, 12:44 pm

mnjmc wrote:
mayugastank wrote:
thewestside wrote:I'm not sure I understand the title of this thread. The top guys in the Mexican cartels are not members of La Eme.
# 3 and #7 are both EME members -EL PALMA SALAZARs wife was killed by a hit squad contracted by the EME. Ive been tryint to reiterate how involved the EME is in world wide narcotics deals ,my previous posts show the most famous murders and most notorious murders of the 90s committed by the EME. BAT MARQUEZ was a suspect in a dozen homicides including the most famous murders of the catholic bishop and the murder of TJs police chief. #3 was in the top leadership spot of the Arellano Felix cartel. Another major figure was POPEYE ARAUZO a CDC verified EME member. POPEYE BARRON of course from my precious posts was an EME member he was at one time mexicos most wanted killer.
Wrong on many things. First and foremost El Guero Palma's wife was not killed by a hit squad of EME. It was a Venezuelan that creeped into his Guero's organization seduced his wife took her to away with her kids, he forced her to take millions from a bank account then killed her and chopped her head off. He then tooks Guero's kids and threw them over a bridge. The Venezuelan man was later arrested in Venezuela, and killed in prison. The story of what happened to Palma's wife is easy to find and it had nothing to do with EME.

#3 was definitely not an EME member and he wasn't even an important figure in the Arellano brothers organization. He was in charge of what little they had in Mexicali at the time. The Arellano's lost so much control over there that he eventually ended up working for el Mayo Zambada. And killing police chiefs in Mexico isn't really that big of a deal, happens all the time, you can't call that one of the most notorious murder of the 90s.

Again Bat was found in some stash house, not any special job, tweaked out. And when they caught him he held no high positions in AFO.

EME is not a factor of what is going on in Mexico with the cartel wars.


olling Stone Tokes Up on Conventional Wisdom
By: Tony Rafael
FrontPageMagazine.com | Wednesday, September 16, 2009



The September 17, 2009 issue of Rolling Stone Magazine ran a deeply flawed story by Guy Lawson on the operations of Mexican Drug Cartels and U.S. law enforcement’s inability to counter the threat on our side of the border. Lawson makes a number of claims that don’t seem to reflect reality. Among Lawson’s more astonishing conclusions is that the DEA “has been a total bust when it comes to nailing top narcos.” According to Lawson, the DEA and other agencies can only grab the low level operators and shooters while the capos elude their grasp. Lawson further claims that law enforcement hasn’t been able to flip operators and develop them into snitches. According to him, the cartels have a far more rigid code of silence than the Cosa Nostra.
These are all falsehoods. The DEA was responsible, by itself or in partnership with law enforcement on both sides of the border, for the arrest of “top narcos” Eduardo Arellano-Felix and Javier Arellano-Felix as well as their upper echelon operators Ismael Higuera-Guerrero, Gilberto Higuera-Guerrero, Efrain Perez, Gustavo Rivera-Martinez, Arturo Paez-Martinez and Jorge Arellano-Felix. These are not the low level “Independent Business Operators” that Lawson claims are the only victories of law enforcement. This was almost the entire upper management of the Arellano-Felix Organization (AFO). And the DEA did it with the help of the snitches Lawson claims don’t exist.
Thanks to an extensive operation of surveillance, radio intercepts and old school infiltration, the DEA nabbed Javier Arellano-Felix on a boat off the coast of California. This significant arrest was made possible, in part, through the use of those very snitches that Lawson claims the DEA can’t seem to develop.
Another Lawson claim is that cartel operators don’t draft U.S. gangsters into their ranks. He claims cartels only use them as bulk buyers and distributors. To support this fallacious claim, Lawson quotes Tom Diaz, a senior policy analyst for The Violence Policy Center. According to Diaz, “American gangs are not integrated into the Mexican drug-trafficking organizations.” The Violence Policy Center, according to its website is a “National educational foundation working to enhance gun control in America.” This is not the group to ask if you want someone well-schooled in the operations of criminal organizations.
The truth is that the AFO, and other cartels, have made strategic alliances with groups like the U.S.-based Mexican Mafia (La Eme). U.S.-born Mexican Mafia members like David Barron, “Bat” Marquez, “Popeye” Araujo and numerous other members and Associates not only operated in the U.S. on behalf of the AFO but some of them actually lived in Tijuana running enforcement and trafficking operations for the AFO. If this doesn’t qualify as integration, then what is?
Barron and Marquez helped kill Catholic Cardinal Juan Ocampo in Guadalajara. Barron was eventually killed in an assassination attempt on Jesus Blancornelas, the editor of a Tijuana newspaper called Zeta. Lawson chooses to ignore this Eme-AFO connection because it apparently doesn’t fit into his pre-conceived opinions of how narcos work.
Based on voluminous evidence I’ve gathered, the AFO, and other cartels, are involved in an active campaign to recruit U.S.-born Hispanic gang members and bring them into the organization. Because they’re American citizens, these street gangsters can easily and legally move across the border and operate all over the U.S. without drawing the kind of attention illegal Mexican nationals would.
One of Lawson’s more startling conclusions is that cartel violence has remained, for the most part, in Mexico and hasn’t migrated into the U.S. Clearly, we haven’t seen the body counts in the U.S. that places like Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez have experienced. If we had, there would be major moves to clamp the border shut. And Lawson accurately states that the cartels don’t want that. Bringing the law down at your choke points, the border crossings, is just stupid.
Where Lawson goes off track is his failure to understand that the war is being waged by the cartels deep behind enemy lines. And the cartels aren’t waging it the way they do in Mexico.
For one, we don’t know for sure how many U.S. homicides can be attributed to the cartels. Just because they don’t decapitate U.S. victims doesn’t mean it’s not a cartel hit. As prior events have demonstrated, cartels recruit local U.S. killers. And U.S. gangs and criminal groups don’t dismember and decapitate. They’re clean, efficient, quick hits. Think of the drive-by shooting and the body found in a park with two bullet holes in the head as the templates for U.S. gang rubouts. A number of the homicides I’ve investigated have be ordered up from Mexico but they don’t necessarily reflect the cartel Modus Operandi . No chopped heads. No arms and legs removed.
In the case of Mexican Mafia assassinations, they don’t look much different than a random killing over a wallet or jewelry. They look like routine homicides. In some cases, it took over a decade of investigation to attribute an apparently routine street homicide to a Mexican Mafia hit.
In numerous cases, cartel targets living in the U.S. are lured across the border and killed in Mexico. The simple reason is that the cartels don’t want that homicide investigated in the U.S. The reason is simple. The cartels have a better opinion of U.S. law enforcement’s crime-busting capabilities than Guy Lawson.
Lawson also fails to mention an entire class of crime that law enforcement calls, “The Disappeared.” These are either U.S.-born or Mexican nationals living in the U.S. who mysteriously drop off the face of the earth. The relatives of these disappeared will get a call and are told not to report the missing person. “We know where you live. We know where you work. And you drive a Brown Nissan Altima. So keep your mouth shut.” That’s the kind of cartel violence that never shows up in the statistics because they’re not reported. In more than a few cases, the victims are American citizens who either ran afoul of the cartels or were kidnapped for ransom.
On August 14, 2009, as if to underscore the August 17 Rolling Stone story’s less than complete grasp of reality, “ill-prepared” U.S. law enforcement charged 17 individuals of kidnapping for ransom and murder in San Diego. Nine victims were killed from 2004 to 2007 and bodies were “dissolved in acid at a rented house in San Diego.” This is classic cartel chemical bath MO right here in the U.S. This cartel splinter group, known as the Palillos, operated just as the cartels do in Mexico. They wore police uniforms on their San Diego snatch jobs, unleashed full-auto weaponry on a San Diego cop, worked out of safe houses and killed their victims even after the ransom was paid. Some of the victims were simply well-off civilians with no ties to narco-trafficking. DEA and other law enforcement agencies cracked the case in part through snitches that Lawson claims can’t be flipped.
It would be foolish to attribute any motive to Guy Lawson’s cherry-picking of facts, selective quotes and going to sources like the Violence Policy Center for information on cartel operations. But it’s clear from Lawson’s final comment that he’s convinced U.S. law enforcement is fighting a losing war on drugs. The same thing was said years ago just before the “ill-prepared” cops on the front lines completely shut down the Colombians and established a cordon sanitaire across the entire Gulf coast.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tony Rafael runs the gang-intelligence blog In The Hat and is the author of The Mexican Mafia

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 15th, 2010, 12:49 pm

mnjmc wrote:
mayugastank wrote:
thewestside wrote:I'm not sure I understand the title of this thread. The top guys in the Mexican cartels are not members of La Eme.
# 3 and #7 are both EME members -EL PALMA SALAZARs wife was killed by a hit squad contracted by the EME. Ive been tryint to reiterate how involved the EME is in world wide narcotics deals ,my previous posts show the most famous murders and most notorious murders of the 90s committed by the EME. BAT MARQUEZ was a suspect in a dozen homicides including the most famous murders of the catholic bishop and the murder of TJs police chief. #3 was in the top leadership spot of the Arellano Felix cartel. Another major figure was POPEYE ARAUZO a CDC verified EME member. POPEYE BARRON of course from my precious posts was an EME member he was at one time mexicos most wanted killer.
Wrong on many things. First and foremost El Guero Palma's wife was not killed by a hit squad of EME. It was a Venezuelan that creeped into his Guero's organization seduced his wife took her to away with her kids, he forced her to take millions from a bank account then killed her and chopped her head off. He then tooks Guero's kids and threw them over a bridge. The Venezuelan man was later arrested in Venezuela, and killed in prison. The story of what happened to Palma's wife is easy to find and it had nothing to do with EME.

#3 was definitely not an EME member and he wasn't even an important figure in the Arellano brothers organization. He was in charge of what little they had in Mexicali at the time. The Arellano's lost so much control over there that he eventually ended up working for el Mayo Zambada. And killing police chiefs in Mexico isn't really that big of a deal, happens all the time, you can't call that one of the most notorious murder of the 90s.

Again Bat was found in some stash house, not any special job, tweaked out. And when they caught him he held no high positions in AFO.

EME is not a factor of what is going on in Mexico with the cartel wars.

Mexico Arrests Alleged Drug Cartel Hitman in 1993 Assassination of Catholic Cardinal
Sunday, January 27, 2008


Print ShareThisTIJUANA, Mexico — An alleged drug cartel hit man who is among the suspects in the 1993 slaying of a Mexican cardinal was arrested in the border city of Tijuana, authorities announced on Saturday.

Alfredo Araujo Avila, also known as "Popeye," allegedly worked for the Tijuana-based Arellano Felix drug cartel for more than two decades, Gen. German Redondo, commander of the local army base, told reporters.

Roman Catholic Cardinal Juan Jesus Posadas Ocampo was riddled with bullets on May 24, 1993, while he was sitting in his car at the airport in Guadalajara, Mexico's second-largest city.

Investigators concluded that gunmen working for the Arellano Felix cartel mistook the cardinal's luxury vehicle for that of a rival drug trafficker whom they were targeting for assassination — and whose own security forces were at the scene and returned fire.

But Church authorities have long disputed the official version of events, arguing that Posadas Ocampo was killed because he knew about alleged relationships between drug dealers and government officials.

Six people besides the cardinal were also killed. Twelve people have since been convicted and imprisoned in the attack, most recently ex-police commander Humberto Rodriguez Banuelos in 2005.

Redondo said Saturday that Araujo Avila is also suspected in the 1997 shooting of Tijuana journalist Jesus Blancornelas, who survived and died of natural causes at age 70 in 2006.

Araujo Avila was detained at a house in Tijuana, across the border from San Diego, California, on outstanding warrants. Redondo said he is also wanted on charges in the United States, but did not elaborate.

The general said the suspect holds American citizenship, but U.S. consular authorities were not immediately available to confirm that. A pistol and a police identification card were found in the house.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 15th, 2010, 12:52 pm

thewestside wrote:
mayugastank wrote:# 3 and #7 are both EME members -EL PALMA SALAZARs wife was killed by a hit squad contracted by the EME. Ive been tryint to reiterate how involved the EME is in world wide narcotics deals ,my previous posts show the most famous murders and most notorious murders of the 90s committed by the EME. BAT MARQUEZ was a suspect in a dozen homicides including the most famous murders of the catholic bishop and the murder of TJs police chief. #3 was in the top leadership spot of the Arellano Felix cartel. Another major figure was POPEYE ARAUZO a CDC verified EME member. POPEYE BARRON of course from my precious posts was an EME member he was at one time mexicos most wanted killer.
mnjmc basically said what I was going to above. Some Eme members doing hits or whatever for the Mexican cartels is one thing. But to say that the "biggest cartel figures" are Eme members is simply not true. And it's misleading.


Although the cartel's free-flowing bankroll neutralized Mexican law enforcement, the forces of rival Mexican drug lord Joaquin (Chapo) Guzman represented a constant danger. A photo of Guzman adorned the wall of the bodyguards' crash pad in Colonia Chapultepec, a fashionable Tijuana neighborhood. "Don't forget this face," the homeboys were told.

One suspected gang member, Juan-Carlos Mendoza Castillo, told police that Araujo hired him in March at a disco on Avenue Revolucion. On May 18, Charlie and Araujo organized a trip. As they passed out plane tickets at the Tijuana airport, Vazcones said "they were going to Guadalajara to kill Chapo," according to Mendoza, a 21-year-old illegal immigrant whom DEA agents arrested in San Diego this month and returned to Mexico.


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Ramon Arellano, 27, led as many as 14 gunmen on the trip, mostly confirmed or suspected Logan Heights gang members inspired by the bounty on Guzman's head, according to U.S. officials. But after stalking Guzman without success for several days, the hit team went to the airport to catch a Tijuana flight on the afternoon of May 24.

The subsequent events remain shrouded in confusion and conspiracy theories. Statements to police by those arrested support the official version: that Arellano and Guzman forces ran into each other by chance at the airport and drew guns.

According to Mexican press accounts, Vazcones said he was tending to a drunk companion in the terminal when he heard shots outside, saw a man he thought was Guzman and fired his pistol at him. Torres also told investigators that he shot at Guzman, who was accompanied by armed escorts wearing federal police badges. Charlie and a man known as Guero, also believed to be a Logan Heights gang member, ran out to the parking lot firing automatic weapons, Mendoza said.

Simultaneously, authorities say, Cardinal Juan Jesus Posadas Ocampo was arriving at the airport to meet an emissary from the Vatican. As the cardinal emerged from his car, a gunman mowed him down with a point-blank volley, according to authorities and Mexican press accounts.

At least eight of the Arellano contingent escaped with the help of airport officials in Guadalajara and Tijuana. Upon returning to Tijuana, Mendoza told police, he learned from another henchman that Guero had mistakenly shot the cardinal.

Conflicting reports cause many Mexicans to question how the cardinal, clad in his clerical collar and black clothes, could have been mistaken for Guzman, who survived the fray but was later captured in Guatemala.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 15th, 2010, 1:18 pm

thewestside wrote:
carlos22338 wrote:the eme needs to take over all the distribution of drugs in the US,and get all mexican gangs under one banner.they already did it in so cal getting mortal enemies to put away there difference.
That will never happen. Running things in prison and in Southern California is one thing. Taking over drug distribution throughout the country is something else. The cartels in Mexico run the show, not La Eme.


THE original hit squad of 14 members of Calle Treinta , who participated in the infamous murders of the 90s and Mexicos first full scale drug war between EL CHAPO GUZMAN and The Arellano Felix CArtel, were led by a mexican mafia member. Some of the ones that were sent to prison were later inducted into the EME. After being proposed for membership in the EME by BAt Marquez , Barron Corona was one of the most powerful figures in the Arellano Felix CArtel, his power came from being able to provide, hit squads -organize murders and get things done. He was eventually killed by accident. The man who killed him WOLFIE would eventually be killed. Taking his place and being the new organizer for the EME in TJ was POPEYE ARAUJO. His name came as a homage to his sponsor and mentor in gang life and life in the EME . POPEYE BARRON. The man who killed el PALMA SALAZAR wife was a real close figure to teh Arellano Felix brothers he was introduced to them by POPEYE ARAJO, who met him at a Tijuana nightclub. The man was known for his perfect english and chicano style attire.To claim that many cartel figures arent joined at the hip to LA EME is to deny the obvious, POPEYE BARRON was a cousin to the ARELLANO FELIXs, by marriage. How much closer does it have to get to link the groups? Unless we are arguing that one of the most powerful criminal orginaztions in the world werent the Arellanos? The vast majority of movers and shakers in that group were (1) EME affiliated , as the 14 hit squad members were or (2) EME members as were POPEYE BARRON< POPEYE ARAUZO<BAT MARQEZ<RICHARD BUCHANNON , who had worked real close to POPEYE ARAUZO for decades, they were related.< RICHARD PARRA was well known in Arellano circles as a guy who handled getting rid of large quantities of dope quickly, he was also an EME member inducted and brought into by RICHARD BUCHANNON.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 15th, 2010, 1:20 pm

thewestside wrote:
carlos22338 wrote:the eme needs to take over all the distribution of drugs in the US,and get all mexican gangs under one banner.they already did it in so cal getting mortal enemies to put away there difference.
That will never happen. Running things in prison and in Southern California is one thing. Taking over drug distribution throughout the country is something else. The cartels in Mexico run the show, not La Eme.
Mexican Mafia's dealings revealed

Prison guard among 37 arrested after 2-year probe

By Gregory Alan Gross
STAFF WRITER

January 28, 2005

A prison guard was among 37 people who have been arrested after a two-year undercover investigation of the Mexican Mafia prison gang and its street-gang associates in San Diego, the FBI said yesterday.

The operation raises questions about the extent to which America's most feared prison gang may have compromised the state prison system itself.

Prison experts say that guards are at constant risk of being co-opted by inmates in general, and prison gangs in particular.

"They've got 24 hours a day to scheme on you, teamwork on you," said Daniel B. Vasquez, a former warden at San Quentin and Soledad state prisons and now a correctional consultant.

Authorities believe that the involvement of a guard with a prison gang is an isolated incident, but "this case sends a messages to guards and employees in the prison system that activities on behalf of the Mexican Mafia will not be tolerated," said FBI supervisor Max Regula of the San Diego office.

The FBI said the arrests were part of what it called Operation "La Mano Negra," a joint operation involving multiple federal, state and local law enforcement agencies, as well as federal and state prosecutors.

La Mano Negra is Spanish for "the black hand," one of the identifying insignias of the Mexican Mafia.

Of the 37 people targeted by the investigation, 22 were arrested yesterday, said Dan Dzwilewski, special agent in charge of the San Diego office. Others already were in custody for prior offenses.

Charges, both state and federal, will range from possession and distribution of methamphetamine to conspiracy, kidnapping for extortion, criminal street gang activity and being a felon in possession of a firearm.

In addition to the arrests, agents seized at least 35 firearms, more than 7 pounds of methamphetamine and more than $36,000, much of it acquired in the course of 25 undercover purchases of weapons and drugs.

The biggest prize of La Mano Negra, however, may have been the arrest of Jessica Chavez, a former guard at Donovan state prison in San Diego's Otay Mesa. She is accused of working for the Mexican Mafia.

The original target of La Mano Negra was Richard Buchanan, 50, a former prisoner described by the FBI as a high-ranking member of the gang.

Agent Dzwilewski said Buchanan and another man, Steve Parraz, 24, had just kidnapped a former Donovan inmate last Aug. 25 when they were stopped by San Diego police.

Buchanan, already being stalked by undercover officers as part of La Mano Negra, was arrested because he was a felon in possession of methamphetamine and a loaded gun, according to the FBI.

Soon after, investigators learned that the kidnapping had been carried out to cover up the prison gang's links to Chavez, the prison guard.

The kidnapped ex-con also had been using Chavez, and Buchanan thought if the con's relationship with Chavez came to light, it might expose her connection to the Mexican Mafia, Regula said.

The abduction of the former prisoner also was meant to show other inmates that the Mexican Mafia was beyond the reach of law enforcement and to be feared, the FBI said.

Chavez, 28, a four-year employee of the California Department of Corrections, was placed on administrative leave last September. She was arrested yesterday in Soledad.

Authorities contend Chavez aided Buchanan in the kidnap plot. Beyond that, however, Chavez's alleged activities on behalf of the prison gang were not detailed yesterday, as many of the court documents in connection with La Mano Negra remained under seal.

"I don't know of any other case where a correctional officer was actually arrested for gang activity," said Terry Thornton, a spokeswoman in Sacramento for the California Department of Corrections.

The Mexican Mafia, also known as "La Eme," is considered by law enforcement to be "the largest and most established prison gang in the United States," with heavy influence over Hispanic street gangs and drug sales outside the prisons, Dzwilewski said.

Asked how many Hispanic street gangs in San Diego were affiliated or cooperated with the Mexican Mafia, Regula replied, "all of them."

While virtually every Latino street gangs might be persuaded or coerced into acting on behalf of La Eme, the number of guards who become conduits for prison gangs is probably small, experts say.

But the inmates are always looking for more, said Vasquez, and they can be both cunning and meticulous in the way they go about it.

"They watch you, they study you, they may ask questions of you – what kinds of sports do you like, what kind of car do you drive," the consultant said. "If you start to get a little too loose with your information, then they start to work on you."

Once the inmates find a guard they feel they can exploit, they might ask a guard for a small favor, said gang consultant Robert Walker, also a former corrections officer.

"They may ask you to mail a letter for them, a birthday card for the wife," Walker said. "The first time a guard does that, they're compromised. They're in a trap and they can't get out of it."

Guards who have been co-opted by inmates are known inside the prison as "mules," said Vasquez, noting that prison gangs use guards to smuggle information into and out of penitentiaries, as well as slipping contraband to the inmates, everything from drugs and guns.

"If you're a good mule, they'll protect you," he said.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 15th, 2010, 1:28 pm

thewestside wrote:
carlos22338 wrote:the eme needs to take over all the distribution of drugs in the US,and get all mexican gangs under one banner.they already did it in so cal getting mortal enemies to put away there difference.
That will never happen. Running things in prison and in Southern California is one thing. Taking over drug distribution throughout the country is something else. The cartels in Mexico run the show, not La Eme.
With Javier's arrest, a U.S. law enforcement official said Eduardo Arellano is likely to have a more active role in the cartel's operations, along with Gustavo Rivera Martinez, a California native who reportedly is in charge of day-to-day operations.

The official spoke anonymously because the investigation is sensitive and investigators aren't supposed to talk about it.

Rivera, 45, is described by law enforcement as a confidant and adviser to Javier Arellano. In 2003, Rivera was indicted in federal court in San Diego on charges of conspiracy to import and conspiracy to distribute controlled substances.

“The machine will continue functioning,” said Clark, the human rights activist. “I don't doubt that their enemies will take advantage of the situation . . . and it could get more violent.”

Defense lawyer John Kirby, who worked on the Arellano case before leaving the U.S. Attorney's Office last year, also predicted chaos.

He disagreed with those who feel Eduardo Arellano would play a larger role, saying that brother hasn't been active for years.

“I don't think there's anybody left who will get the same kind of loyalty out of the rest of the organization,” Kirby said.

But Blancornelas, the newspaper editor, said Eduardo and an Arellano sister who hasn't been named in any U.S. indictment have been important decision-makers in the cartel.

THE ARTICLE ABOVE NAMES KNOWN MEXICAN MAFIA MEMBER AND MEMBER OF BARRIO LOGAN HEIGHST AS THE NEW LEADER OF THE TJ CARTEL. IF YOU CHECK THE PREVIOUS POST YOULL NOTICE THAT HE WAS THE SAME MAN ARRESTED FOR THE MURDER OF THE CARDINAL IN MEXICO

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by Coup » January 15th, 2010, 2:47 pm

The original target of La Mano Negra was Richard Buchanan, 50, a former prisoner described by the FBI as a high-ranking member of the gang.

Buchanan doesn't sound like a Spanish name to me?

This another wood...former AB or something allowed in, or is he down with a Sur hood?

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by Coup » January 15th, 2010, 3:01 pm

Eme flipped that slutty bitch and the FBI are going to flip her back...

I always heard or read that the SD sur's had direct connects to the Mexicans....the nixxas in SD always were able to get good prices and top shit...those old prison fucks are trying to get in deep...instead of getting their feet wet they are trying to make long lasting moves....

I remember years ago the reports of the eme gunners that worked for the Mexicans that were killed by the Mexican feds....dudes tried to press the Mexicans on their shipments...go through eme or dont come through Cali or some shit....it didn't work but they are still trying...

I gotta agree with thewestside on this....eme cant successfully press these dudes with no major leverage...sur hoods will tell eme to fuck off if the cartels come pushing the weight to them directly...isnt that how the Mexicans came to power??? Columbians starting payin their Mexican shippers in weight rather then cash...now they got shit damn near on lock

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 15th, 2010, 3:13 pm

Coup wrote:Eme flipped that slutty bitch and the FBI are going to flip her back...

I always heard or read that the SD sur's had direct connects to the Mexicans....the nixxas in SD always were able to get good prices and top shit...those old prison fucks are trying to get in deep...instead of getting their feet wet they are trying to make long lasting moves....

I remember years ago the reports of the eme gunners that worked for the Mexicans that were killed by the Mexican feds....dudes tried to press the Mexicans on their shipments...go through eme or dont come through Cali or some shit....it didn't work but they are still trying...

I gotta agree with thewestside on this....eme cant successfully press these dudes with no major leverage...sur hoods will tell eme to fu-- off if the cartels come pushing the weight to them directly...isnt that how the Mexicans came to power??? Columbians starting payin their Mexican shippers in weight rather then cash...now they got shit damn near on lock


I from my investigating it, I see the opposite --the major hitters in Areallano Felix Cartel are EME members. That guy in my previous post POPEYE ARAUZO was deep real deep, he was suspect in tons of hits south of the border -he was one of the major players in TJ alongside POPEYE BARRON a well known eme member. He was known as little POPEYE. All these cats were from different hoods around SD. Ill POST A FEW

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 15th, 2010, 3:19 pm

Coup wrote:Eme flipped that slutty bitch and the FBI are going to flip her back...

I always heard or read that the SD sur's had direct connects to the Mexicans....the nixxas in SD always were able to get good prices and top shit...those old prison fucks are trying to get in deep...instead of getting their feet wet they are trying to make long lasting moves....

I remember years ago the reports of the eme gunners that worked for the Mexicans that were killed by the Mexican feds....dudes tried to press the Mexicans on their shipments...go through eme or dont come through Cali or some shit....it didn't work but they are still trying...

I gotta agree with thewestside on this....eme cant successfully press these dudes with no major leverage...sur hoods will tell eme to fu-- off if the cartels come pushing the weight to them directly...isnt that how the Mexicans came to power??? Columbians starting payin their Mexican shippers in weight rather then cash...now they got shit damn near on lock




GANG LINKED TO SLAYING OF CARDINAL MEXICAN DRUG BOSSES HIRED YOUNG GUNS FROM SAN DIEGO


St. Louis Post-Dispatch; 7/12/1993; 1993, Chicago Tribune




St. Louis Post-Dispatch

07-12-1993

WHEN MEXICO'S Arellano drug lords needed new gunmen, they looked across the border, to San Diego's impoverished Logan Heights barrio.
The drug traffickers found what they were looking for in the Calle Treinta (30th Street) gang.

U.S. and Mexican officials believe the gang members were responsible for gunning down a Roman Catholic cardinal, perhaps by mistake, and six others May 24 at the airport at Guadalajara.
Six gang members have been arrested in the United States and Mexico for their role in the airport shootout, and more are being sought.
The youths bragged about their exploits back in San Diego, officials say, and claimed to be behind the machine-gunning in April of a drug kingpin in the Mexican resort town of Cancun. That spray of bullets killed a tourist from Colorado.
The arrests offer the first evidence that U.S. street gangs have been tapped by Latin American drug traffickers. Law enforcement officials worry that the unholy alliance may lead to an escalation of violence on both sides of the 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexico border.
"I think everybody should be concerned," said Julius Beretta, agent in charge of the Drug Enforcement Administration office in San Diego. "These are indiscriminate shootings. People are saying, `My God, they killed a cardinal. What are they going to do to me?' "
Cardinal Juan Jesus Posadas Ocampo, dressed in black clerical garb, was shot 14 times from as close as three feet.
The incident sparked widespread outrage in Mexico and prompted President Carlos Salinas de Gotari to order a crackdown on that nation's increasingly powerful and brazen drug traffickers.
Authorities say gang members in custody have described a two-year relationship with the Arellano drug family - Francisco, Benjamin, Ramon and Javier - four brothers who police say long have controlled the flow of drugs between Tijuana and San Diego.
For now, the Arellanos' decision to hire the young guns from San Diego appears to have backfired. But with millions of dollars at stake running Colombian cocaine and Mexican marijuana into the United States, Beretta and others warn it will be just a matter of time before traffickers try to resume their operations.
There have been other examples of U.S. street gangs hooking up with international organized crime operations. U.S. officials cite Chicago's El Rukn gang conspiracy with Libyan terrorists in the 1980s and links between the Mafia and outlaw motorcycle gangs.
Urban gangs are not known to have been recruited by Latin American drug lords, but authorities say the common language and violent climate in border-city barrios make the connection a convenient one.
William Esposito,agent in charge of the FBI office in San Diego, said, "I suspect other cartels will be using gang members in the future."
Recruited by a former gang member who became an Arellano confidante, Calle Treinta became a traveling entourage of bodyguards and assassins for the drug-running brothers, U.S. investigators say. In exchange, they received thousands of dollars and high-powered weapons.
Officials believe the Arellanos hired the gang members after a rival Mexican drug lord, Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, made inroads into the area's narcotics business.
Officials say Guzman was responsible for a 1,400-foot-long tunnel discovered last spring by Mexican officials running under the border south of San Diego.
The rival drug clans recently staged a series of tit-for-tat murders in Mexico and Southern California. Officials believe that Guzman was the target of the shooting that killed the cardinal.
Since their arrest, the San Diego gang members reportedly have told investigators that they were paid $15,000 apiece to go to Guadalajara, where Guzman was visiting in May. Authorities quoted them as saying the Arellanos promised $15,000 more to whoever killed Guzman.
Guzman has been arrested; authorities still are seeking the Arellanos and a member of the San Diego barrio gang believed to be the primary gunman in the shooting of the cardinal.
Officials on both sides of the border have not yet figured out how the murder plot resulted in the death of the cardinal.
One theory is that the cardinal and his chauffeur happened to drive into the airport as shooting erupted between gang members and Guzman's bodyguards. Another holds that the gang members mistook the cardinal for Guzman because he was riding in a car similar to the drug lord's.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 15th, 2010, 3:23 pm

Coup wrote:Eme flipped that slutty bitch and the FBI are going to flip her back...

I always heard or read that the SD sur's had direct connects to the Mexicans....the nixxas in SD always were able to get good prices and top shit...those old prison fucks are trying to get in deep...instead of getting their feet wet they are trying to make long lasting moves....

I remember years ago the reports of the eme gunners that worked for the Mexicans that were killed by the Mexican feds....dudes tried to press the Mexicans on their shipments...go through eme or dont come through Cali or some shit....it didn't work but they are still trying...

I gotta agree with thewestside on this....eme cant successfully press these dudes with no major leverage...sur hoods will tell eme to fu-- off if the cartels come pushing the weight to them directly...isnt that how the Mexicans came to power??? Columbians starting payin their Mexican shippers in weight rather then cash...now they got shit damn near on lock



SD and ARELLANO CONNECTIONS


AFO Enforcer and Mexican Mafia Member Faces New Drug Charges

United States Attorney Karen P. Hewitt announced today the unsealing of five criminal complaints charging a total of 12 individuals with federal drug trafficking and firearm violations. The charges stem from an undercover investigation conducted by the San Diego Violent Crimes Task Force - Gang Group into the illegal activities of the Mexican Mafia prison gang and associated Latino street gangs in the San Diego area.

Four of the five complaints charge 11 defendants, including Mexican Mafia member Jose Alberto “Bat” Marquez, with Conspiracy to Distribute Methamphetamine. Marquez, who is currently in federal custody, was indicted in the Southern District of California in 2002 for conspiracies to import and distribute marijuana and cocaine as part of the Arellano-Felix drug trafficking organization; as noted in the 2002 indictment, Marquez acted as an enforcer, bodyguard, and caretaker of stash houses for the Arellano-Felix organization. Marquez was extradited from Mexico to the United States in January 2007. The complaint alleges that in April 2007 Marquez orchestrated a methamphetamine deal involving at least two other Mexican Mafia associates, despite being in federal custody.

All four drug trafficking complaints charge that the defendants knowingly and intentionally conspired with each other and others to distribute 50 grams and more of methamphetamine. The complaints also allege that, in addition to ties to the Mexican Mafia, several of the defendants have ties to various San Diego street gangs, including: South Side Mob, Logan Heights Red Steps, Shelltown, and Del Sol. Also charged in the complaints are Julia Morones, Maria Madriaga, Brian Mark Smith, Juan Manuel Velarde, Marco Corrado, Ruben Santos, Roland Montemayor, and Jorge Lopez-Herrera.

The fifth criminal complaint charges Mario Bejar, a member of the Old Town National City street gang, with being a Felon in Possession of a Firearm, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 922(g)(1) and 924. The complaint alleges that Bejar, an individual with felony convictions in San Diego County for attempted robbery and robbery, did unlawfully possess and sell a Mauser 98K 8 mm rifle.

The defendants are expected to be arraigned in federal court on Friday, June 6, 2008, at 1:30 p.m. before Magistrate Judge Leo S. Papas.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mnjmc » January 15th, 2010, 9:04 pm

EME IS NOT A FACTOR IN TIJUANA.

Even when they were back in the 90s the most they ever did was run a squad of killers. What you fail to understand is that the Arellanos had plenty of those and the only reason Popeye had in special place was from what happened in Puerto Vallarta.

With all the articles you posted you seem to forget that all the EME members you mentioned in those articles all have one thing in common, THEY ARE ALL IN PRISON. And they were in have been in prison for years already.

Now you mention that article from Tony Rafael, which is very slanted, to make what he has been researching, which is EME, seem more important than it really is. Tony Rafael has a whole blog pretty much dedicated to EME, he talks about other subjects but he fancies himself an expert on EME. He even wrote a book about them, as you have said. Tony, like you, likes to pump the importance of EME's role in the Tijuana cartel. EME's job in the AFO was to kill people, the Arellanos also paid their gunmen with cocaine which they would smuggle across the bother and get customers to buy from them, but never has the Arellanos allowed an EME hit squad to run drug smuggling operations. EME members were part of the Arellanos back then, but they never were much more than hired guns. Tony does the same shit you do which is bring up old cases to make it seem like EME is still in deep with the Arellanos which is false.
mayugastank wrote:THE ARTICLE ABOVE NAMES KNOWN MEXICAN MAFIA MEMBER AND MEMBER OF BARRIO LOGAN HEIGHST AS THE NEW LEADER OF THE TJ CARTEL. IF YOU CHECK THE PREVIOUS POST YOULL NOTICE THAT HE WAS THE SAME MAN ARRESTED FOR THE MURDER OF THE CARDINAL IN MEXICO
None of the people in that Article were EME members. Gustavo Rivera Martinez may have been born in California but he was never never part of EME. Also he was never a contender to run what was left of the AFO, not to mention he was arrested 2008. The AFO is run today by Fernando Sanchez Arellano aka "el Ingeniero" no one in law enforcement dispute that. Outside of the of BAT and Popeye and there crew who can you name that is working with the Arellanos right now? All the people connected to BAT and Popeye are in Prison, they do not matter.

Another thing is that the Arellanos were never one of the most powerful organizations in the world. They were hyped up pretty good because they were outside the power of structure in Mexico. One thing a would give them credit for is that they managed to survive the onslaught by the government and the much more powerful Sinaloa Cartel. At their height the Arellanos controlled the all the BAJA border, but the Sinaloans when they were in harmony controlled it from Arizona, New Mexico, and a chunk of Texas. And they still managed to get dope through the BAJA border.

And again you don't know what happened to EL Guero's wife. It had nothing to with EME, it didn't even had anything to with the AFO either. The person that had Guero's wife killed was Miguel Felix Gallardo, I know that is their uncle but it still had nothing to do with the Arellanos.

From what I'm reading from you it seems as if you like to automatically assume that the gunners or even someone even born in California, like Gustavo Rivera Martinez, is an EME member. I will give you a chance though.

One last question.

IN THE YEAR 2010 TEN IS THERE ANY EME MEMBER CURRENTLY ACTIVE WITH THE ARELLANOS IN A HIGH LEADERSHIP POSITION?

DO NOT BRING UP OLD CASES AND ARTICLES

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 18th, 2010, 5:34 am

None of the people in that Article were EME members. Gustavo Rivera Martinez may have been born in California but he was never never part of EME. Also he was never a contender to run what was left of the AFO, not to mention he was arrested 2008. The AFO is run today by Fernando Sanchez Arellano aka "el Ingeniero" no one in law enforcement dispute that. Outside of the of BAT and Popeye and there crew who can you name that is working with the Arellanos right now? All the people connected to BAT and Popeye are in Prison, they do not matter.

This guy was a well known Shelltown gang member. He was brought along with Bat Marquez and voted on in 1994 to become an EME member. Bat proposed about 7 guys that night and only 2 were initiated. He was not known to the members in the room at the time and they felt he was TOO UNKNOWN and not verifiable. The guys indcuted that night were Barron Corona and Popeye Araujo. Bat Marquez would eventually fall arrested for a parole violation leaving his name in the air for the next 5 years as a policy was instituted banning any new membership due to the lack of credentials the fairly new members had and do to their poor quality. According to Rene Enriquez. Bat Marquez again floated his name while in prison and kites were sent out getting ahold of his credentials. He along a handful of members were the only known members of the EME to be made a new member from 1993-2000. Another was the killer of the AMERICAN ME movie JOKER. POPEYE ARAUJO was and is a fairly new arrestee. He was arrested in 2008. He had been part of the AFO for 2 decades he is a WELL KNOWN EME member and their is no denying his closeness to the Arellanos. The transcript of the hotel tapes are about 10,000 pages long I will post some of what I have said here. Another factor -I have to say the Arellanos are close to the EME is the death of a member in a boating accident. In the aftermath of his death well known shelltown and Gamma members were said to have rushed the funeral parlor and stole his body. Its kinda hard to deny that Surenos are all over the mix in TJ doing hits -moving weight and actively participating with the AFO. Barron -Corona, was a cousin to the Arellanos so the blood ties are their.MORE TO COME...............

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 18th, 2010, 6:21 am

FBI adds L.A. gang member to 10 Most Wanted list
Jose Luis Saenz is suspected of killing four people, including his girlfriend, since 1998. He allegedly is an enforcer for a Mexican drug cartel.
October 21, 2009|Richard Winton
A Los Angeles gang member and Mexican drug cartel enforcer who, authorities say, killed four people, including the mother of his child, is now on the FBI's 10 Most Wanted fugitive list.

Jose Luis Saenz, a Cuatro Flats gang member, shot and killed two rivals from the East LA Trece gang in a Boyle Heights housing project a decade ago, authorities say. He then allegedly kidnapped, raped and killed his girlfriend -- who was also the mother of his infant daughter -- because he feared that she would talk to authorities.




Detectives with the Los Angeles Police Department have searched for Saenz since then. Last year, a video emerged of a smiling man calmly walking up to a Whittier-area front door and rubbing his hands together. Moments later the gunman executed a 38-year-old victim who apparently owed money to a drug cartel. When Los Angeles County sheriff's homicide detectives showed the video to LAPD investigators, they said it was Saenz.


Saenz "is one of the worst offenders I have ever seen," said Special Agent Scott Garriola, a 22-year FBI veteran. "He's got a long career of killing, and that's just what we know about."

Federal agents and detectives say Saenz -- who goes by "Zapp," "Smiley" and "Toro" -- has transformed from a gang member to a drug cartel enforcer over the last decade. Authorities say he has vowed to kill any police officer who pursued him.

Standing nearly 6 feet tall and bearing several tattoos, including the word Flats on his right arm, Saenz allegedly committed the first killings on July 25, 1998, when he and another gang member went to the Aliso Village housing project.

According to detectives, they pretended to be there for a drug buy but were really planning an ambush. The reason, authorities say, was because East LA Trece gang members had beaten the second gunman a week earlier. Authorities allege Saenz executed Josue Hernandez and Leonardo Ponce.

Saenz then fled from the scene and hid in the apartment of his girlfriend, Sigreta Hernandez, authorities said. On Aug. 5, however, Saenz allegedly kidnapped her and drove her to a house in an unincorporated area of Los Angeles. Saenz then allegedly raped her and shot her in the head. His grandmother discovered the woman's body.

Prosecutors have charged Saenz with three counts of murder, one count of kidnapping and one count of rape, and have secured a warrant for his arrest. Despite a hefty reward offered by the Los Angeles City Council, Saenz was not seen again until last year.

In August 2008, two members of the Lott Stoner gang were stopped in Missouri by a state trooper while driving a rental vehicle. Inside a secret panel, $620,000 was found. The money, which was confiscated, was wrapped and marked with the name "Toro," according to the FBI. Two months later, one of the gang members was killed at his Whittier-area home. Investigators suspect Saenz did not believe police took the money.

Unbeknownst to Saenz, the home surveillance system of victim Oscar Torres, 38, was recording at the time of the killing. Saenz is seen arriving at Torres' house, chasing the victim and then shooting him in the head, authorities said.

--

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 18th, 2010, 6:36 am

Prison gang, drug cartel link probed



By Andy Furillo -- Bee Staff Writer
Published 2:15 am PST Thursday, December 9, 2004


SAN DIEGO - Investigators from the Department of Corrections called the National City barbershop "the war room," a meeting place where the Mexican Mafia directed its underworld business by the border.

It was run, they said, by an ex-convict named Roberto Ramiro Marin, one of 35 defendants indicted in January in a case in which California Mexican Mafia leaders were accused of ordering freelance drug dealers beaten and robbed for not paying their "taxes."

OAS_AD('Button20');The 52-count case highlights the ongoing connection between the prison-based Mexican Mafia gang and an international drug cartel across the border. It also is linked, through Marin, to a correctional sergeant accused of trying to help a Mexican Mafia associate escape from prison, on a $500,000 payoff from the cartel.

The escape plot was ultimately foiled and the sergeant eventually fired. But the San Diego indictment provides more evidence of the Mexican Mafia's entrenched organized crime operation, its link to the Arellano Felix cartel in Tijuana, its reach throughout the state - and its potential for corruption.

"There's been a general agreement - drugs come over through the Arellano Felix organization, and then drugs are distributed by the Mexican Mafia through Hispanic neighborhoods," said Mark Amador, a San Diego County deputy district attorney prosecuting the case against Marin and 34 other defendants charged in the conspiracy case. "Southern California, Central California, it's the same thing, under (Mexican Mafia) control."

The Department of Corrections disciplinary action against former correctional Sgt. Michael S. Erickson developed independently from the San Diego district attorney's indictment. But the two cases have one key player in common: Marin.

He is scheduled for trial in May.

In the disciplinary case against Erickson, the sergeant's fellow officers testified that the inmate he was accused of trying to help escape, Carlos Sarmiento, a convicted burglar out of Los Angeles, was not only a Mexican Mafia associate, but also had relatives in the cartel.

Once the escape plot was discovered and thwarted in early 2001, corrections officials launched an internal investigation into Erickson that led to his firing in July 2002 from the R.J. Donovan Correctional Facility in San Diego. The department forwarded the results of its investigation to the San Diego District Attorney's Office. But evidence wasn't handled properly, and San Diego prosecutors said they didn't have enough to sustain a criminal conviction.

The testimony at Erickson's termination hearing that linked the former sergeant to both the prison gang and the drug cartel sent shudders through the Department of Corrections.

"It was a very serious matter and we take it that way," said Corrections Department spokeswoman Margot Bach. "It's unfortunate that in a department this size we have a few bad apples."

Erickson, 41, has since moved to Douglas, Ariz. He denied in a telephone interview that he committed any misconduct. He said he wanted to sue the state to get his job back but that he couldn't afford an attorney.

"I was railroaded," Erickson said.

The former sergeant acknowledged that he used to get his hair cut in the National City barbershop that has been identified as a Mexican Mafia hangout. He also confirmed that he continued to get his hair cut by defendant Marin even after he moved to Chula Vista.

Erickson said he didn't know Marin, 56, was in the Mexican Mafia. He said as many as 50 other correctional employees got their hair cut at the same two shops.

Bach said no evidence was ever compiled linking the other officers to the Mexican Mafia and that cases like Erickson's are exceedingly rare. The Corrections' spokeswoman said the only one even remotely similar to it is a 1993 case where they unsuccessfully tried to fire a chief deputy warden for getting too close to the prison gang.

Erickson was getting his hair cut at the National City barbershop about the same time the Mexican Mafia and the Arellano Felix organization were forging their links and generating headlines on both sides of the border. In 1993 Mexican authorities said the two groups were involved in the murder of the archbishop of Guadalajara, and U.S. authorities said a Mexican Mafia-Arellano Felix hit squad in 1997 nearly killed a Tijuana newspaper editor who had crusaded against the cartel.

In the meantime, the Arellano Felix group, with help north of the border from street gangs working under the Mexican Mafia, imported uncounted tons of cocaine, methamphetamine and marijuana into the United States - and laid down a reign of terror on anybody who cheated on them, competed against them or informed on them to the police, according to authorities and court documents.

Southern California law enforcement sources suspect that as many as 100 unsolved homicides over the last 15 years may be the result of Mexican Mafia-Arellano Felix violence. Twenty homicides are identified in a federal drug-trafficking indictment unsealed last year in San Diego.

Local authorities in San Diego launched a wiretap investigation into the two groups last year after receiving information that prison gang operatives were planning to kill a National City police officer.

Officials said they were able to foil the murder plot. In the meantime, the surveillance tuned them in to numerous conversations about a drug distribution ring and a violent campaign to "tax" drug dealers in the San Diego area, with the proceeds going to the Mexican Mafia.

Authorities said the lead defendant in the drug case, Jose Albert Marquez, 44, served as the link between the Mexican Mafia and the Arellano Felix Organization when he moved to Mexico after his 1997 parole from Pelican Bay State Prison.

Arellano Felix operatives bought Marquez a ranch, officials said, and put him to work as an enforcer in Tijuana.

"He became a contact for Mexican Mafia members and associates paroling to the Southern California region," alleged Devan Hawkes, a Department of Corrections investigator at Pelican Bay.

Marquez was arrested in Mexico last year while the San Diego investigation was under way and charged in the 1997 attack on the Tijuana editor - but not until he was caught on wiretaps talking to underlings who relayed his messages to Marin.

Erickson said he didn't know Marin was a gang leader "until after my hearing, and then I find out he's a big-time dude."

"All he did was cut my hair, and my kid's hair," he said.

Marin's lawyer, W. Allen Williams, laughed at the depiction of his client, who has pleaded not guilty, as a "godfather."

Williams said the barbershop-as-Mafia-HQ "is an urban legend." Marin, the lawyer said, "is a sick, old man" who was living in a run-down apartment at the time of his arrest.

But correctional officers and inmates both testified at Erickson's Personnel Board hearing about the National City barbershop, how Marin ran it, and how Erickson got caught up with the prison gang and the cartel.

One prison officer, Sean Beever, testified that Erickson offered him $100,000 for an old identification card - saying he wanted it for the escape try.

"I told him the whole thing was crazy, that you're going to wind up in here with these guys," Beever said.

Beever testified that Erickson told him he had met in Los Angeles with relatives of Sarmiento, the Mexican Mafia associate with relatives in the Arellano Felix cartel.

According to Beever, Erickson planned to smuggle in an officer's jumpsuit and the fabricated ID. Sarmiento would then be able to walk out of the prison and Erickson would drive him to the border and drop him off, Beever testified.

Beever also testified that Erickson told him Sarmiento's family offered to pay the sergeant $500,000.

"They had went to clubs and rode in limos, and everything was worked out," Beever testified. "The money was there." Beever said he told another officer about the plan, who in turn called Department of Corrections internal investigators. Within a day, Sarmiento was hustled out of R.J. Donovan to another prison and the investigation into Erickson was under way.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 18th, 2010, 7:09 am

FBI: Mexican Cartel Crime Linked To San Diego County
Lauren Reynolds
10News I-Team Reporter

POSTED: 2:47 pm PST November 6, 2008
UPDATED: 8:52 pm PST November 6, 2008

SAN DIEGO -- Mass murders to send messages to rivals, daytime shootouts near schools and lucrative and brutal kidnappings are recent occurrences in Tijuana that are a growing concern to San Diego's FBI office.

"The violence of these kidnappings is beyond what I have ever seen in my career," says Keith Slotter, Special Agent in Charge.

The bloody war between rival drug cartels in Tijuana can be felt north of the U.S.-Mexico border.


"Some of the violence, some of the organizational aspects that exist in Tijuana and Baja, has spilled over into the U.S., especially the San Diego area," admits Slotter.

He says the cartels' drug trade into the U.S. has slowed over the last year, replaced with more human trafficking, extortions and kidnappings.

"The concern of more kidnappings of more victims being kidnapped here and then the victims being brought south is always a huge concern to us, perhaps our biggest concern in the kidnapping area," says Slotter.

This year, 15 U.S. citizens or legal residents have been kidnapped by gangs linked to the cartels. Some have been killed, and others were traded for ransom.

"The ransoms vary, and sometimes it is for a lot of money," Slotter says.

Those participating in the cartel violence and business also have ties to the U.S.

"You've got the Mexican Mafia, a very powerful gang organization both south of the border and here in California, especially in the San Diego area," says Slotter.

Other sources in law enforcement tell the I-Team that about half the recent cartel members murdered in Tijuana were deported by the U.S. government after spending time in U.S. prisons.

"So gang operations within various prisons in the U.S. are very strong, alive, and well," says Slotter



















THIS ARTICLE STATES AT LEAST HALF TEH PEOPLE KILLED IN TJ DRUG WAR WERE DEPORTED US GANG MEMBERS -MOST SPENT TIME IN CALIFORNIA PRISONS AND A GOOD HANDFUL WERE PROBABALY EME CONNECTED SAFE TO SAY> THE EME IS A SERET ORGANIZATION SO ITS HARD TO FIND CASES WERE TEHIR IDENTITY IS ACTUALLY KNOWN UNLESS THEY SNITCH OR HAVE TATTOOS AFTER BEING FOUND DEAD

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 18th, 2010, 7:13 am

Deportees are linked to Mexico crime rate

Tijuana police blame U.S. felons for robberies, kidnappings and killings

By Anna Cearley
STAFF WRITER

September 12, 2004



PEGGY PEATTIE / Union-Tribune
A Mexican national with a criminal record in the United States was deported Thursday through a separate entrance at the San Ysidro border crossing. U.S. officials say the number of felons deported each year to Mexico has increased in recent years.



Criminal deportee now a shopkeeper



Edward Gutierrez grew up in a Los Angeles suburb where illegal immigrants come to raise their children in hopes of a better life. Gutierrez took a different path, joining a gang and getting in trouble with the law. At 20, he was sentenced to 15 years in prison for armed robbery.

Because Gutierrez is a Mexican citizen, the U.S. government deported him eight years later when he was released from custody. He ended up in Tijuana, and promptly became Mexico's problem.

Gutierrez, 31, now sits in a Mexican prison, accused of killing two people in a Tijuana apartment last year. One of the victims also was a deported L.A.-area gang member.

The heavily tattooed Gutierrez, known by his English nickname "Shy Boy," faces up to 50 years in prison if convicted. He declined requests for an interview but says he is innocent.

Mexican authorities in Baja California say they are disturbed by a trend they have noticed in recent years of more criminal deportees living in border communities. They blame some of these deportees, particularly L.A-area gang members, for contributing to Baja California's crime rate.

The number of felons deported each year to Tijuana and Mexicali has grown – from 6,300 in 1995 to 9,500 in 2003, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.



Mexican police handout
Edward "Shy Boy" Gutierrez was deported and is now charged with killing two people in Tijuana.

The increase is due to 1996 immigration law changes, which widened the definition of which criminals could be deported, according to immigration attorneys and U.S. government officials.

But the recent observation by Mexican authorities also might be due to tighter border security since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. In the past, many deportees were able to quickly cross back into the United States by using their fluent English to talk their way in. Now it's not so easy, and many are deterred because felons can face up to 20 years in prison if caught trying to re-enter.

Once in Mexico, some of the criminal deportees try to eke out an honest living, but Tijuana police blame others for creating gangs and committing armed robberies, kidnappings and killings.

City officials say that even those who were convicted of lesser offenses such as drunken driving or shoplifting in the United States may be tempted to get into more serious trouble out of exasperation.

"Since they don't have any money or identification and no means to work or eat, they get involved in criminal activities, committing assaults and robberies," Tijuana Councilman Alcide Beltrones Rivera said. "The moment they commit these acts here, it costs us to keep them in jail, to feed them and to clothe them."

U.S. to Baja California deportations Deportations* to Baja California have decreased steadily, according to Mexican immigration statistics.**
Criminal deportations to Baja California have increased, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

*A deportation means the case has gone before a U.S. immigration judge. Most migrants caught trying to cross the border waive their right to a hearing and are voluntarily returned to Mexico.




Tijuana and other border cities don't believe that's fair because the deportees, though Mexican citizens, often have little or no connection to those communities.

Some were brought illegally to the United States at a young age from Mexico's interior. Others have worked for years in the United States, where their children and families still live. In some cases, they obtained legal immigration status but put off acquiring U.S. citizenship.

The issue is one of many deportation and repatriation issues that Mexican officials are discussing with their U.S. counterparts.


More warning
Mexican officials want the United States to do a better job informing them of criminal deportations so they can arrest any migrants who have pending Mexican warrants and keep an eye on the rest.
U.S. authorities say they often notify Mexican officials but are working on improving the system. The challenge, they say, lies in coordinating their efforts with a vast array of U.S. correctional institutions.

Of the 161,000 inmates in California prisons, 18,500 are slated for deportation upon release, said Lauren Mack, spokeswoman for Immigration and Customs Enforcement. About 70 percent end up in Mexico.

Ronald Smith, who oversees detention and removal operations for the agency's San Diego office, said Mexico needs to take responsibility for its citizens.

"They can't be allowed to remain in our communities where they have the potential to commit even more crimes," he said.

Gutierrez already had a criminal record in the United States when he was convicted in 1993 of using a gun to steal money and jewelry from a couple, according to Los Angeles Superior Court records.

Gutierrez was sentenced to 15 years in prison and served about half of the sentence. He was deported from prison to Mexicali on Aug. 14, 2001, according to U.S. immigration records. He apparently re-entered the United States because the next record on Gutierrez shows he was deported again to Mexico on Nov. 13, 2002.

A few days later, he tried once more to cross into the United States at Calexico, but he was caught in the tighter border security after Sept. 11.

Gutierrez was a prime candidate for deportation, but the 1996 immigration law changes mean that people can be deported after being sentenced to just a year or more in prison. This includes people convicted of sexual abuse of a minor, domestic violence, drunken driving and drug and firearms possession.

As a result, the number of criminal deportees sent from the United States to all corners of the world rose from 29,072 in 1995 to 77,710 in 2003, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Meanwhile, the Sept. 11 attacks focused attention on the gaps in immigration enforcement within the United States. People who once might have slipped through the cracks began to be deported for immigration violations as well as criminal activities.

This year, Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced that it wants to deport more than 80,000 criminals who aren't in custody. The effort affects many people who served prison terms and were released into U.S. communities before the 1996 immigration law change. They are being targeted because the law is retroactive.

Many immigration attorneys believe violent criminals should be deported but worry the law is being applied to the extreme under the guise of protecting the country from terrorists. David Leopold, an attorney based in Cleveland, said he recently represented someone ordered deported for pulling his wife's hair during an argument.

"I think it's more of a numbers game to make the government look tough to the American public," he said.


Adrift in Tijuana
Although deporting people with criminal records is intended to make U.S. communities secure, the deportations have left Mexican border cities feeling unsafe.
An average of 26 felons are formally deported to Baja California each day, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement, but the deportees arrive in Tijuana or Mexicali with little or no money, usually far from their hometowns.

Not all are gang members. This spring, Jose Arroyo Torres, 48, found his way to Tijuana's migrant shelter after being deported to Mexicali in March. He said he had just completed prison time for his second drunken-driving conviction.

Arroyo said he had lived in the United States since he was 18 and used to work at a Vista nursery. He said he obtained his legal residency status, which he no longer has, in 1985. He has a wife, from whom he is separated, and a 10-year-old daughter in the United States.

"I'm just trying to find my way around, but Tijuana has changed," he said. "I just want to find a job. I can work as a bricklayer or making clothes."

One of the immediate challenges faced by deportees is how to earn money.

Most Mexican employers require official identification such as a voter registration card. The shelter gives the deportees temporary identifications, which can help them get basic jobs. But after the cards expire in two weeks, the deportees are in a fix.

Obtaining a voter registration card requires documents that many criminal deportees no longer possess, such as a birth certificate.

The criminal deportees also face cultural challenges. Their tattoos scare off potential employers, and they get funny looks for speaking an urban street slang Spanish.

"Lots of them have been living in the United States since they were children, and they feel like they aren't wanted here or there," said Maria Teresa Sanchez Medrana, who oversees the Tijuana city department of migrant services. "Sometimes we have them meet with our psychologists."

In Gutierrez's case, according to Mexican court records, surviving in Mexico meant finding others like him. In Tijuana, he ran into Elias David Martinez Estrada, an L.A. gang member he recognized from his time in a California prison.

Nicknamed "The Ghost," Martinez belonged to a different L.A. gang, Gutierrez told Mexican police. But that didn't seem to matter in Tijuana.

Martinez took Gutierrez under his wing, providing him with food and setting him up in a seedy apartment near the tourist strip of Avenida Revolución. The entrance – a dark hallway separated from the street by a blue metal door – has been named "Alley of the Dead" by neighbors who say that drug overdoses and other violent acts are commonplace there.

Gutierrez became involved with a group that was selling drugs, according to several people who testified to police.

Baja California police say that on Sept. 15, 2003, Gutierrez killed Martinez and a woman, Angela Yudid Romero Rodriguez, in the apartment after an argument over a pair of tennis shoes got out of control. He was arrested this year by Mexican state investigators. They estimate that criminal deportees are involved in about 5 percent of the city's homicides.

Tijuana's city police, which conduct street patrols, have started to keep photo files of the criminal deportees they encounter.

Since last year, they have collected photos of more than 100 deportees, some from as far as Northern California and Las Vegas. Many sport intricate tattoos: an eagle on the back of one man's shaved head, gang names sprawled across a torso, and human figures etched on another's back.

"They think everyone should fear them," said Jose Alfredo Silva Perez, who oversees the Tijuana police department's anti-graffiti and gang unit. "They go around with their shirts off showing their tattoos, and sometimes if they are drugged they can be aggressive."

About 200 deported L.A. gang members have established their own gangs in at least seven neighborhoods, police said.

Police are worried they may tap into Tijuana's generally less-violent street gangs, which mostly get in trouble for tagging walls and property. They also suspect that deported U.S. gang members are being recruited by drug cartels and organized crime groups.


Attracting attention
Criminal deportees also have been accused in some of the city's recent high-profile crimes, although they don't always turn out to be the right targets.
When a police officer was killed and his police partner seriously wounded last year, city officials blamed the violence on criminal deportees.

One of the suspects had been repeatedly deported after being arrested for robbery and migrant smuggling in the United States, according to Mexican court records. He was released after authorities determined he had no connection to the police shooting.

Some doubt Gutierrez is guilty.

"They just want someone to be guilty so they can close their case," said Jose Luis Perez, 33, another criminal deportee, who said his mother brought him illegally to San Diego when he was 3.

Perez said he dropped out of Mission Bay High School in 11th grade and got in trouble with the law. The last time he was deported, in 2003, he stayed for a short time at the same apartment where Gutierrez lived.

Police regularly cruise by the apartment, which has no running water or plumbing, while people with dazed looks wander inside and leave with mysterious packages. Some neighbors believe police are demanding payoffs from the hotel's residents in exchange for leaving them alone, something police deny.

Perez, who has since moved to a hotel that is a slightly better place to live, said he has been surviving in Tijuana by doing odd jobs, such as electrical work and construction. On a good day, he said, he earns about $15. Some of that comes from selling drugs, he admitted, but he said he's trying to stay away from other trouble.

"The reason I stay here is that I don't want to have to do more time there (in the United States)," he said. "At least I'm free here, even though I don't know what will happen today or tomorrow."



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anna Cearley: (619) 542-4595; anna.cearley@uniontrib.com


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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by youngspade » January 18th, 2010, 9:21 am

mayugastank wrote:FBI: Mexican Cartel Crime Linked To San Diego County
Lauren Reynolds
10News I-Team Reporter

POSTED: 2:47 pm PST November 6, 2008
UPDATED: 8:52 pm PST November 6, 2008

SAN DIEGO -- Mass murders to send messages to rivals, daytime shootouts near schools and lucrative and brutal kidnappings are recent occurrences in Tijuana that are a growing concern to San Diego's FBI office.

"The violence of these kidnappings is beyond what I have ever seen in my career," says Keith Slotter, Special Agent in Charge.

The bloody war between rival drug cartels in Tijuana can be felt north of the U.S.-Mexico border.


"Some of the violence, some of the organizational aspects that exist in Tijuana and Baja, has spilled over into the U.S., especially the San Diego area," admits Slotter.

He says the cartels' drug trade into the U.S. has slowed over the last year, replaced with more human trafficking, extortions and kidnappings.

"The concern of more kidnappings of more victims being kidnapped here and then the victims being brought south is always a huge concern to us, perhaps our biggest concern in the kidnapping area," says Slotter.

This year, 15 U.S. citizens or legal residents have been kidnapped by gangs linked to the cartels. Some have been killed, and others were traded for ransom.

"The ransoms vary, and sometimes it is for a lot of money," Slotter says.

Those participating in the cartel violence and business also have ties to the U.S.

"You've got the Mexican Mafia, a very powerful gang organization both south of the border and here in California, especially in the San Diego area," says Slotter.

Other sources in law enforcement tell the I-Team that about half the recent cartel members murdered in Tijuana were deported by the U.S. government after spending time in U.S. prisons.

"So gang operations within various prisons in the U.S. are very strong, alive, and well," says Slotter



















THIS ARTICLE STATES AT LEAST HALF TEH PEOPLE KILLED IN TJ DRUG WAR WERE DEPORTED US GANG MEMBERS -MOST SPENT TIME IN CALIFORNIA PRISONS AND A GOOD HANDFUL WERE PROBABALY EME CONNECTED SAFE TO SAY> THE EME IS A SERET ORGANIZATION SO ITS HARD TO FIND CASES WERE TEHIR IDENTITY IS ACTUALLY KNOWN UNLESS THEY SNITCH OR HAVE TATTOOS AFTER BEING FOUND DEAD

The bold is sometimes and alot of times, true!

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mnjmc » January 18th, 2010, 4:10 pm

mayugastank wrote:Deportees are linked to Mexico crime rate

Tijuana police blame U.S. felons for robberies, kidnappings and killings

By Anna Cearley
STAFF WRITER

September 12, 2004



PEGGY PEATTIE / Union-Tribune
A Mexican national with a criminal record in the United States was deported Thursday through a separate entrance at the San Ysidro border crossing. U.S. officials say the number of felons deported each year to Mexico has increased in recent years.



Criminal deportee now a shopkeeper



Edward Gutierrez grew up in a Los Angeles suburb where illegal immigrants come to raise their children in hopes of a better life. Gutierrez took a different path, joining a gang and getting in trouble with the law. At 20, he was sentenced to 15 years in prison for armed robbery.

Because Gutierrez is a Mexican citizen, the U.S. government deported him eight years later when he was released from custody. He ended up in Tijuana, and promptly became Mexico's problem.

Gutierrez, 31, now sits in a Mexican prison, accused of killing two people in a Tijuana apartment last year. One of the victims also was a deported L.A.-area gang member.

The heavily tattooed Gutierrez, known by his English nickname "Shy Boy," faces up to 50 years in prison if convicted. He declined requests for an interview but says he is innocent.

Mexican authorities in Baja California say they are disturbed by a trend they have noticed in recent years of more criminal deportees living in border communities. They blame some of these deportees, particularly L.A-area gang members, for contributing to Baja California's crime rate.

The number of felons deported each year to Tijuana and Mexicali has grown – from 6,300 in 1995 to 9,500 in 2003, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.



Mexican police handout
Edward "Shy Boy" Gutierrez was deported and is now charged with killing two people in Tijuana.

The increase is due to 1996 immigration law changes, which widened the definition of which criminals could be deported, according to immigration attorneys and U.S. government officials.

But the recent observation by Mexican authorities also might be due to tighter border security since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. In the past, many deportees were able to quickly cross back into the United States by using their fluent English to talk their way in. Now it's not so easy, and many are deterred because felons can face up to 20 years in prison if caught trying to re-enter.

Once in Mexico, some of the criminal deportees try to eke out an honest living, but Tijuana police blame others for creating gangs and committing armed robberies, kidnappings and killings.

City officials say that even those who were convicted of lesser offenses such as drunken driving or shoplifting in the United States may be tempted to get into more serious trouble out of exasperation.

"Since they don't have any money or identification and no means to work or eat, they get involved in criminal activities, committing assaults and robberies," Tijuana Councilman Alcide Beltrones Rivera said. "The moment they commit these acts here, it costs us to keep them in jail, to feed them and to clothe them."

U.S. to Baja California deportations Deportations* to Baja California have decreased steadily, according to Mexican immigration statistics.**
Criminal deportations to Baja California have increased, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

*A deportation means the case has gone before a U.S. immigration judge. Most migrants caught trying to cross the border waive their right to a hearing and are voluntarily returned to Mexico.




Tijuana and other border cities don't believe that's fair because the deportees, though Mexican citizens, often have little or no connection to those communities.

Some were brought illegally to the United States at a young age from Mexico's interior. Others have worked for years in the United States, where their children and families still live. In some cases, they obtained legal immigration status but put off acquiring U.S. citizenship.

The issue is one of many deportation and repatriation issues that Mexican officials are discussing with their U.S. counterparts.


More warning
Mexican officials want the United States to do a better job informing them of criminal deportations so they can arrest any migrants who have pending Mexican warrants and keep an eye on the rest.
U.S. authorities say they often notify Mexican officials but are working on improving the system. The challenge, they say, lies in coordinating their efforts with a vast array of U.S. correctional institutions.

Of the 161,000 inmates in California prisons, 18,500 are slated for deportation upon release, said Lauren Mack, spokeswoman for Immigration and Customs Enforcement. About 70 percent end up in Mexico.

Ronald Smith, who oversees detention and removal operations for the agency's San Diego office, said Mexico needs to take responsibility for its citizens.

"They can't be allowed to remain in our communities where they have the potential to commit even more crimes," he said.

Gutierrez already had a criminal record in the United States when he was convicted in 1993 of using a gun to steal money and jewelry from a couple, according to Los Angeles Superior Court records.

Gutierrez was sentenced to 15 years in prison and served about half of the sentence. He was deported from prison to Mexicali on Aug. 14, 2001, according to U.S. immigration records. He apparently re-entered the United States because the next record on Gutierrez shows he was deported again to Mexico on Nov. 13, 2002.

A few days later, he tried once more to cross into the United States at Calexico, but he was caught in the tighter border security after Sept. 11.

Gutierrez was a prime candidate for deportation, but the 1996 immigration law changes mean that people can be deported after being sentenced to just a year or more in prison. This includes people convicted of sexual abuse of a minor, domestic violence, drunken driving and drug and firearms possession.

As a result, the number of criminal deportees sent from the United States to all corners of the world rose from 29,072 in 1995 to 77,710 in 2003, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Meanwhile, the Sept. 11 attacks focused attention on the gaps in immigration enforcement within the United States. People who once might have slipped through the cracks began to be deported for immigration violations as well as criminal activities.

This year, Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced that it wants to deport more than 80,000 criminals who aren't in custody. The effort affects many people who served prison terms and were released into U.S. communities before the 1996 immigration law change. They are being targeted because the law is retroactive.

Many immigration attorneys believe violent criminals should be deported but worry the law is being applied to the extreme under the guise of protecting the country from terrorists. David Leopold, an attorney based in Cleveland, said he recently represented someone ordered deported for pulling his wife's hair during an argument.

"I think it's more of a numbers game to make the government look tough to the American public," he said.


Adrift in Tijuana
Although deporting people with criminal records is intended to make U.S. communities secure, the deportations have left Mexican border cities feeling unsafe.
An average of 26 felons are formally deported to Baja California each day, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement, but the deportees arrive in Tijuana or Mexicali with little or no money, usually far from their hometowns.

Not all are gang members. This spring, Jose Arroyo Torres, 48, found his way to Tijuana's migrant shelter after being deported to Mexicali in March. He said he had just completed prison time for his second drunken-driving conviction.

Arroyo said he had lived in the United States since he was 18 and used to work at a Vista nursery. He said he obtained his legal residency status, which he no longer has, in 1985. He has a wife, from whom he is separated, and a 10-year-old daughter in the United States.

"I'm just trying to find my way around, but Tijuana has changed," he said. "I just want to find a job. I can work as a bricklayer or making clothes."

One of the immediate challenges faced by deportees is how to earn money.

Most Mexican employers require official identification such as a voter registration card. The shelter gives the deportees temporary identifications, which can help them get basic jobs. But after the cards expire in two weeks, the deportees are in a fix.

Obtaining a voter registration card requires documents that many criminal deportees no longer possess, such as a birth certificate.

The criminal deportees also face cultural challenges. Their tattoos scare off potential employers, and they get funny looks for speaking an urban street slang Spanish.

"Lots of them have been living in the United States since they were children, and they feel like they aren't wanted here or there," said Maria Teresa Sanchez Medrana, who oversees the Tijuana city department of migrant services. "Sometimes we have them meet with our psychologists."

In Gutierrez's case, according to Mexican court records, surviving in Mexico meant finding others like him. In Tijuana, he ran into Elias David Martinez Estrada, an L.A. gang member he recognized from his time in a California prison.

Nicknamed "The Ghost," Martinez belonged to a different L.A. gang, Gutierrez told Mexican police. But that didn't seem to matter in Tijuana.

Martinez took Gutierrez under his wing, providing him with food and setting him up in a seedy apartment near the tourist strip of Avenida Revolución. The entrance – a dark hallway separated from the street by a blue metal door – has been named "Alley of the Dead" by neighbors who say that drug overdoses and other violent acts are commonplace there.

Gutierrez became involved with a group that was selling drugs, according to several people who testified to police.

Baja California police say that on Sept. 15, 2003, Gutierrez killed Martinez and a woman, Angela Yudid Romero Rodriguez, in the apartment after an argument over a pair of tennis shoes got out of control. He was arrested this year by Mexican state investigators. They estimate that criminal deportees are involved in about 5 percent of the city's homicides.

Tijuana's city police, which conduct street patrols, have started to keep photo files of the criminal deportees they encounter.

Since last year, they have collected photos of more than 100 deportees, some from as far as Northern California and Las Vegas. Many sport intricate tattoos: an eagle on the back of one man's shaved head, gang names sprawled across a torso, and human figures etched on another's back.

"They think everyone should fear them," said Jose Alfredo Silva Perez, who oversees the Tijuana police department's anti-graffiti and gang unit. "They go around with their shirts off showing their tattoos, and sometimes if they are drugged they can be aggressive."

About 200 deported L.A. gang members have established their own gangs in at least seven neighborhoods, police said.

Police are worried they may tap into Tijuana's generally less-violent street gangs, which mostly get in trouble for tagging walls and property. They also suspect that deported U.S. gang members are being recruited by drug cartels and organized crime groups.


Attracting attention
Criminal deportees also have been accused in some of the city's recent high-profile crimes, although they don't always turn out to be the right targets.
When a police officer was killed and his police partner seriously wounded last year, city officials blamed the violence on criminal deportees.

One of the suspects had been repeatedly deported after being arrested for robbery and migrant smuggling in the United States, according to Mexican court records. He was released after authorities determined he had no connection to the police shooting.

Some doubt Gutierrez is guilty.

"They just want someone to be guilty so they can close their case," said Jose Luis Perez, 33, another criminal deportee, who said his mother brought him illegally to San Diego when he was 3.

Perez said he dropped out of Mission Bay High School in 11th grade and got in trouble with the law. The last time he was deported, in 2003, he stayed for a short time at the same apartment where Gutierrez lived.

Police regularly cruise by the apartment, which has no running water or plumbing, while people with dazed looks wander inside and leave with mysterious packages. Some neighbors believe police are demanding payoffs from the hotel's residents in exchange for leaving them alone, something police deny.

Perez, who has since moved to a hotel that is a slightly better place to live, said he has been surviving in Tijuana by doing odd jobs, such as electrical work and construction. On a good day, he said, he earns about $15. Some of that comes from selling drugs, he admitted, but he said he's trying to stay away from other trouble.

"The reason I stay here is that I don't want to have to do more time there (in the United States)," he said. "At least I'm free here, even though I don't know what will happen today or tomorrow."



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anna Cearley: (619) 542-4595; anna.cearley@uniontrib.com


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You see these articles are a perfect example of what I'm talking about. Yes gang members that get deported commit crimes in Mexico but that has nothing to do with cartel business. The people those gang members killed never had anything to with drug cartels, hell a lot of times its just taking their rivalries to Mexico. They usually end up killing deportees like themselves and people connected to them like their girlfriends, like article you posted showed. So let me ask you this, WHAT THE HELL DOES THAT HAVE TO DO WITH CARTEL BUSINESS? Nothing, not a fucking thing. What you are doing is making all these speculation you have, that you made up in your brain, and trying to make it reality. When you and that article said that many gang members from the US get killed in Tijuana it didn't surprise but its usually between other gang members in the US doing it to each other.

And you keep doing the same shit, posting old articles about even older cases. Popeye Araujo same thing as Bat when they found them neither of them held any position in the Arellano Felix Organization. You mistake a loose affiliation with the Arellanos with actually being part of them. Popeye Barron was the only one you mentioned that had any status in the Arellano brothers, right after he died EME did not have very close contact with them. Gustavo Rivera Martinez was never in EME I honestly think you got your people confused, but most importantly he was NEVER AT ANY MOMENT thought of the to be a contender for leadership of the Tijuana cartel. That reporter that wrote that article must not be too familiar with the cartels in Mexico because Gustavo had no where near the rank that article was giving him.

I am not denying that Surneno/EME hoods and people are in Tijuana doing things for the Cartel but they are not apart of them. Those are two totally different things you are not understanding. Especially if they grew up on the border and have friends and relatives in Tijuana you are going to move around both the US and Mexico much easier. If you happen to have relatives and friends that are associated with the Arellanos they could hook you up. That's usually how it happens. EME or any other hood working in Tijuana are at the complete mercy of the Arellanos. You could not do anything without their permission, not so much now because other cartels are invading but definitely in the 90s. Law enforcement pump up the importance of EME on this side of the border because its a way for them to get more recognition and more money for their department. But in Mexico if you ask about EME they will look at you like what the fuck is that?

Coup
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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by Coup » January 18th, 2010, 4:32 pm

I am reading it differently....I know that you are trying to connect them, but I am back to them pressing the cartels for a place at the big Mexican table...it was known about deported eses setting up shop in TJ...Mexico...cartels are not stupid...each deported ese is a new connect to LA...new buyers/dealers to work with.

I still think eme tried to press the cartels....they had a few gunners in their ranks in Mexico...knew they had dedicated connects across the border...probably learned enough about their business that they could press on both ends....shit didnt work and the Mexicans let the feds handle them....SD is KNOWN to have topshelf shit....connects are a hop skip jump away....SD eme shotcallers got the game on lock in the sur hoods.

Mayuga...is this what you are getting at? I dont see the prison cats running shit with the cartels...but I see them being the brokers and taking a big piece of the business the surs in SD are making....shit that alone makes them brokers. And it makes more sense.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mayugastank » January 18th, 2010, 6:34 pm

Coup wrote:I am reading it differently....I know that you are trying to connect them, but I am back to them pressing the cartels for a place at the big Mexican table...it was known about deported eses setting up shop in TJ...Mexico...cartels are not stupid...each deported ese is a new connect to LA...new buyers/dealers to work with.

I still think eme tried to press the cartels....they had a few gunners in their ranks in Mexico...knew they had dedicated connects across the border...probably learned enough about their business that they could press on both ends....shit didnt work and the Mexicans let the feds handle them....SD is KNOWN to have topshelf shit....connects are a hop skip jump away....SD eme shotcallers got the game on lock in the sur hoods.

Mayuga...is this what you are getting at? I dont see the prison cats running shit with the cartels...but I see them being the brokers and taking a big piece of the business the surs in SD are making....shit that alone makes them brokers. And it makes more sense.


What I am getting at coup is the connections they have -irregardless of what mjmc says Popeye Araujo was a big eme connect in TJ. He was in several books like twilight on the line and was talked about in great deal in most AFO books or documentarys he wasnt just some dude hanging around the Arellanos, dude owned a few ranches and mansions and tried to extort Chapo Guzman connects thru EME contacts in LA. The other guy Gustavo is an EME member very active since at least 1995. The most notorious murders of the 1990s were committed by eme hit squads. Being that close to t he border and having so much connection to deportees makes collaboration inevitable.

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Re: Biggest Cartel Figures EME members

Unread post by mnjmc » January 19th, 2010, 2:30 am

mayugastank wrote:
Coup wrote:I am reading it differently....I know that you are trying to connect them, but I am back to them pressing the cartels for a place at the big Mexican table...it was known about deported eses setting up shop in TJ...Mexico...cartels are not stupid...each deported ese is a new connect to LA...new buyers/dealers to work with.

I still think eme tried to press the cartels....they had a few gunners in their ranks in Mexico...knew they had dedicated connects across the border...probably learned enough about their business that they could press on both ends....shit didnt work and the Mexicans let the feds handle them....SD is KNOWN to have topshelf shit....connects are a hop skip jump away....SD eme shotcallers got the game on lock in the sur hoods.

Mayuga...is this what you are getting at? I dont see the prison cats running shit with the cartels...but I see them being the brokers and taking a big piece of the business the surs in SD are making....shit that alone makes them brokers. And it makes more sense.


What I am getting at coup is the connections they have -irregardless of what mjmc says Popeye Araujo was a big eme connect in TJ. He was in several books like twilight on the line and was talked about in great deal in most AFO books or documentarys he wasnt just some dude hanging around the Arellanos, dude owned a few ranches and mansions and tried to extort Chapo Guzman connects thru EME contacts in LA. The other guy Gustavo is an EME member very active since at least 1995. The most notorious murders of the 1990s were committed by eme hit squads. Being that close to t he border and having so much connection to deportees makes collaboration inevitable.
Gustavo was not an EME member. And the only famous hit EME committed was a fuck up when they killed the Cardinal, or if the Cardinal was killed on purpose EME were the fall guys, because when EME was there they thought they were trying to kill Chapo. Some of the other hits you mentioned weren't even carried out by EME but by the Juniors.

I never denied that EME had connections to the Arellanos or that they did work for the them either. In all the articles you posted did you ever realize that other than all the EME people connected to the Arellanos are all in prison already they have another thing in common, THEY ALL WERE FOLLOWING ORDERS FROM THE ARELLANOS. EME did not do what they wanted, they were told what to do. If EME members ever tried the Arellanos too hard the AFO would of killed off EME in Tijuana.

EME were only part of their enforcement team. And their favorite hitman was not Popeye Barron it was Fabian Martinez Gonzalez el Tiburon.

Now outside of the whole Popeye Barron's crew who in the fuck did EME have out there in Tijuana? All the articles you post that have a legitimate connection with EME and the Arellanos goes back to Barron. These days all of his crew are all locked up, what EME had in Tijuana in the 90s is gone.

LAST FUCKING TIME. IN THE YEAR 2010 DOES EME HAVE A CLOSE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARELLANOS?

DO NOT BRING UP OUTDATED CASES.

DON'T TRY AND PULL THAT BS ABOUT EME BEING A SECRET ORGANIZATION THEREFORE ITS IMPOSSIBLE TO KNOW. AS MUCH AS YOU KNOW IT'S CLEAR EME AINT SO SECRET.

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