info on Samoans and Tongans

These concepts are socially constructed and have been given much weight. What are your thoughts?
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info on Samoans and Tongans

Unread post by MICK » July 11th, 2005, 10:03 am

I was interested in learning about these two cultures. They seem interesting to me. What countries did they come from?
How did they get here?
what is their religion?

Any info would be appreciated.

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Unread post by $outh$ide » July 11th, 2005, 9:20 pm

tongan n samoan r christain (not catholic) they r meet to came from sth east asia(?)i guess they got dere by boat. the maori's of new zealand r meant to b decentz of polynesians(tonga,samoa,cook islands) that went there hundreds of yrs ago. Tonga is know as the friendly islands(but if u piss dem off fark) n r ruled by a king (kingdom of tonga) tongans n samoans dont like each otha(for yrs) 1 of me tongan friends said they tryed to take ova samoa n samoa did the same to tonga datz all i got 4 now

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Unread post by MICK » July 11th, 2005, 9:26 pm

ok thanks brother. Anyone else?

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Unread post by Sentenza » July 12th, 2005, 12:13 pm

A Short Tongan History

The word Tonga means "south" in numerous Polynesian languages. Some scholars believe the inhabitants originally came from the islands now known as Samoa. Archaeological evidence indicates that the Tonga islands have been settled since at least 500 B.C., and local traditions have carefully preserved the names of the Tongan sovereign for about 1,000 years. The power of the Tongan monarchy reached its height in the 13th century. At the time, chieftains exercised political influence as far away as Samoa.

During the 14th century, the King of Tonga delegated much of his temporal power to a brother while retaining the spiritual authority. Sometime later, this process was repeated by the second royal line, thus resulting in three distinct lines: the Tu'i Tonga with spiritual authority, which is believed to have extended over much of Polynesia; the Tu'i Ha'atakalaua; and the Tu'i Kanokupolu. The latter two had temporal authority for carrying out much of the day-to-day administration of the kingdom.

Dutch navigators in 1616 were the first Europeans to sight the Tongan archipelago. The main island of Tongatapu was first visited by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1643. Continual contact with Europeans, however, did not begin until more than 125 years later. Captain James Cook visited the islands in 1773 and 1777 and gave the archipelago the name "the Friendly Islands" because of the gentle nature of the people he encountered. He, of course, was never aware of the acrimonious debate that raged among contending nobles over who should have the honor of attacking Cook's tiny fleet and killing its sailors. In 1789, the famous mutiny on the British ship, Bounty, took place in the waters between the Ha'apai and Nomuka island groups.

Shortly after Captain Cook's last visit, warfare broke out in the islands as the three lines of kings contended for dominance. At about the same time, young Tongan nobles serving as mercenaries took Tongan culture to Fiji's most eastern island group, the Laus. The first missionaries, attached to the London Missionary Society, arrived in Tonga in 1747. A second missionary group followed in 1822, led by Walter Lawry of the Wesleyan Missionary Society. They converted Taufa'ahau, one of the claimants to the Tu'i Kanokupolu line, and Christianity began to spread throughout the islands.

At the time of his conversion, Taufa'ahau took the name of Siaosi (George) and his consort assumed the name Salote (Charlotte) in honor of King George III and Queen Charlotte of England. In the following years, he united all of the Tongan islands for the first time in recorded history. In 1845, he was formally proclaimed King George Tupou I, and the present dynasty was founded. He established a constitution and a parliamentary government based, in some respects, on the British model. In 1862, he abolished the existing system of semi-serfdom and established an entirely alien system of land tenure. Under this system every male Tongan, upon reaching the age of 16, was entitled to rent--for life and at a nominal fee--a plot of bushland (api) of 8.25 acres, plus a village allotment of about three-eights of an acre for his home.

Tonga concluded a treaty of friendship and protection with the United Kingdom in 1900 and came under British protection. It retained its independence and autonomy, while the United Kingdom agreed to handle its foreign affairs and protect it from external attack.

During World War II, in close collaboration with New Zealand, Tonga formed a local defense force of about 2,000 troops that saw action in the Solomon Islands. In addition, New Zealand and U.S. troops were stationed on Tongatapu, which became a staging point for shipping.

A new treaty of friendship and protection with the United Kingdom, signed in 1958 and ratified in May 1959, provided for a British Commissioner and consul in Tonga who were responsible to the Governor of Fiji in his capacity as British Chief Commissioner for Tonga. In mid-1965 the British Commissioner and consul became directly responsible to the U.K. Secretary of State for Colonial Affairs. Tonga became fully independent on June 4, 1970, an event officially designated by the King as Tonga's "reentry into the community of nations."

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Unread post by Sentenza » July 12th, 2005, 12:15 pm

Samoa
History

The origins of Samoa are shrouded in an ambiguity that is pure Samoa. The most popular theory is that Samoans, like other Polynesians, originated from the East Indies, the Malay peninsula or the Philippines, but Samoans tell a different story. Other Polynesians, they say, might have come from Asia but Samoans come from Samoa. They believe themselves to be the cradle of Polynesian culture, a race of people created by the god Tagaloa while he was cooking up the world. In fact the Samoan legend of the beginning of the world is startlingly similar to that told in Genesis.

Despite its reputation as an exotic, far-away land Samoa was in fact as busy as a shopping mall from the mid-1770s when trading ships, sailing along the spice route and looking for the Great Southern Land, popped in and out with monotonous regularity. Much of the early contact and bloody encounters between Samoans and Europeans took place in the islands that are now part of American Samoa but the islands of independent Samoa suffered the same diseases and acts of violence that came with the European ships. By the time the British arrived, looking for the troublesome Christian Fletcher and his band of merry mutineers, the Samoans were hardly in a welcoming mood. In the resulting head-to-head between the British and the Samoans, lives were lost on both sides and gave rise to the unwarranted reputation that Samoans were hostile and aggressive.

Given this violent history it's a miracle that the missionaries arriving in the early 19th century, brandishing their Bibles and threats of everlasting damnation, weren't killed immediately. Instead there were wholesale conversions, a phenomenon that might be explained by the fact that Christianity and old Samoan beliefs were not dissimilar and that the Samoan god Nafanua had predicted the coming of a new religion which would be stronger and more powerful than the old gods. The fire power and wealth of the palagi (Europeans or 'sky bursters') was obvious and the enthusiastic embracing of Christianity may have had more to do with religious pragmatism than blind faith. These early soul-scouting expeditions were brief affairs, long on brio but short on planning. This changed in 1836 when John Williams and Charles Barff became the first two men to take up missionary posts in Samoa. Williams converted a large number of Samoans before ending up as main course at a traditional Melanesian feast. The untimely demise of Reverend Williams did not stop the onward Christian soldiers and the influence of these early missionaries was so profound that even today Samoa is known as the Bible Belt of the Pacific.

By the late 19th century Britain, America and Germany all had their hackles raised and were pulling at Samoa in a three-way tug-of-war, which had much to do with commerce and the flexing of military muscles and not much to do with 'protecting' Samoa. Tensions escalated and more ships were called in until there were no fewer than seven warships bristling and snarling inside the small confines of the Apia harbour. The whole shebang started to look like a bad joke ('the British, the Americans and the Germans were in a Mexican standoff in Samoa...'), when the punch line was delivered. So busy were they watching each other that they failed to notice the falling barometer and before they knew it a cyclone of epic proportions had hit. After the dust had settled, six of the ships had either sunk or been scuttled. The only surviving ship was the British ship Calliope. The cyclone knocked a bit of sense into the Europeans and they went to the table to negotiate but the result for the Samoan islands wasn't much better. Samoa was carved up piecemeal with Western Samoa being handed to the Germans, Eastern Samoa going to the Americans, and the British going home empty-handed.

Germany made the classic colonialist's error of disregarding local customs and kings and before long the indigenous inhabitants were chafing under autocratic foreign rule. The Western Samoans formed a resistance force, the Mau Movement, dedicated to the preservation of their culture and the establishment of independence. The outbreak of war in 1914 changed the Euro-Pacific arena and Germany had a few other problems on its hands apart from a rebellious Samoan resistance movement. As part of the war effort Britain asked New Zealand if they wouldn't mind, old chap, taking over the radio station in Western Samoa which they duly did in an operation that was more Dad's Army than the Dardenelles. Hoisting a white serviette (no-one could find a white flag or hanky), they were received by one or two minor officials from the German government who apologised for not being able to authorise the surrender of Western Samoa and then promptly went AWOL. New Zealand heroically 'captured' the radio station by fossicking around in the bushes for the parts of the radio station thrown away by the defeated army and then 'liberated' Westeren Samoa.

A change in rulers meant little to the Mau Movement or the majority of Western Samoans who continued to agitate for independence. New Zealand continued to govern the islands, introducing rugby and possibly even Jandals into the cultural mix. Finally in 1961 a proposal was put before the United Nations and independence was granted in January 1962. Unfortunately, it was not all smooth sailing. Labour disputes and increasing dependence on foreign aid meant reality fell short of the dream, but things really got black when the country was ripped apart by back-to-back cyclones and their main export crop, taro, was decimated by a fungal blight.

The country, which changed its name in 1995 to the Independent State of Samoa, fell into an economic hole from which it has never fully recovered, although tourism and financial laws designed to attract offshore capital are now easing the pressure. Indeed, Samoa's efforts to become an international finance centre landed it in some trouble when an OECD report of 2001 listed the country as one of 35 tax havens conducive to money-laundering.

Samoa marked the 40th anniversary of its independence with a ceremony at Apia attended by New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark. She used the occasion as an opportunity to apologise to Samoans for their treatment at the hands of New Zealanders during colonial times.

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Unread post by Anonymous20 » July 12th, 2005, 12:29 pm

Why is it though that Samoans, Tongans also Maori in New Zealand have more gangs (from what I read on here) than for example Tahitians or other islanders in the pacific? Is it because of the language, any historical differences, oppression, that make it so? Or maybe they all have gangs just that you don't hear about all of them?

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Unread post by Tyrant » July 12th, 2005, 5:34 pm

they're BIG

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Unread post by MICK » July 12th, 2005, 6:37 pm

Thats actualy something else I was interested in.

Somoans look hispanic to me. Well, hawaian realy, but they look a little hispanic.

I have heard on here that there are samoan crip sets.

So do they take on a black gang style, or a chicano stlye, or do they have thier own style?
(as far as clothes and structure)

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Unread post by DC » July 12th, 2005, 9:02 pm

Mick, google the words "Boo Yaa Tribe" and have a look at photos that come up. These guys are Samoans from LA and are rappers and ex gangbangers. The way to tell the difference between a Samoan and a Tongan is by hair and skin tone. Samoans have straight hair whilst Tongans have more curly afro type hair, and generally Tongans are darker in skin colour. I work with alot of these guys and they are big dudes. Another thing is Samoans generally bang Blood whereas Tongans bang Crip, eg TCG (Tongan Crip Gang) and Samoan Warriors Bounty Hunters (Bloods).

DC

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Unread post by MICK » July 12th, 2005, 9:19 pm

ok thanks brother.

So they typicaly run in black gangs?

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Unread post by DC » July 12th, 2005, 9:25 pm

Yes, but they also have there own Blood and Crip gangs as well. In LA its not uncommon for a Samoan to be in a Black Crip or blood gang.

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Unread post by MICK » July 12th, 2005, 9:26 pm

OK, I just ran an image search on boo ya tribe.

They look hispanic as hell!!! I would have thought they were mexican or P. rican.

in the pic I saw, they dress like cholos. The flannel shirts with the top buttoned and the bottom open. Plus there was hispanic grafitti in the background.
Looked like Joker Tattoo designs on the wall.

So they dont ally themselves with latinos?

What is their language?

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Unread post by DC » July 12th, 2005, 9:28 pm

They speak a Polynesian Language similar to Hawiian or Tahitian, I think there style is a cross between Mexican and Black.

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Unread post by MICK » July 12th, 2005, 9:31 pm

Thats cool as hell. I knew a few Samoan wrestlers, but only on a "hey how's it goin?" level. Thats pretty cool.

So can anyone list the names of all the somoan and tongan gangs you know of?

How crazy are their gangs?

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Unread post by MICK » July 12th, 2005, 9:33 pm

By the way, does Eminem have anything to do with boo ya tribe?
his name kept popping up when I was doing that search.

Whats that about?

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Unread post by DC » July 12th, 2005, 10:07 pm

Samoan Gangs in LA

SOS - Sons of Samoa (Crips)
Samoan Warriors Bounty Hunters (Bloods).

Tongans Gangs in LA

TCG - Tongan Crip Gangs

Not too sure why Eminems name shows up but maybe because he is also a rapper like the Boo Yaa tribe. The majority on Samoans are located in
Long Beach and Carson in Los Angeles. There are also alot of Samoans in
San Francisco, Utah, Seattle and San Diego. The reason being is that the Island of Samoa (America Samoa) is classed as a US Territory which makes them US Subjects therefore they get entry to the US.

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Unread post by DC » July 12th, 2005, 10:17 pm

Follow this link for there new clip.

http://www.lnqs.com/klips?00529

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Unread post by PREACH » July 13th, 2005, 1:21 am

im hawaiian-born n raised in l.a. i also banged with rsp-royal samoan posse out of santa ana. someone asked why is tongans and samoans the only poly race that bang. simple, they are the majority in main land amerikkka.the reason why theres not any hawaiian gangs in the main land (except for 186 st. hawaiian mafia in gardena)(30 deep)is because we are all spread out and dont live in an all poly community. i grew up around samoans so as a hawaiian it felt natural to bang with them because we were both poly's.alot of hawaiians bang we just dont live in a hawaiian community. in hawaii it's different cuz there are hawaiian communities and hawaiian gangs do exist there.
samoan gangs in l.a.
long beach-e/s and w/s sons of samoa crips w/chapters in the bay, hawaii, seattle, utah and samoa
compton-parc village compton crips(some black members)
carson-west side piru, skott park piru, chronicles, hamosidals, calas park loks, kabbage patch piru(some black members)
orange county-royal samoan posse crip, samoan kid style crip, krook it crip, krook city bloods,
tongan gangs in l.a.
inglewood and hawthorne-tonga crip gang w/chapters in the same places as sos except in samoa , they are in tonga
n. long beach-tonga for life crip
tonga style crip mostly found in utah

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Unread post by PREACH » July 13th, 2005, 1:31 am

i forgot to mention ifd-insane freak daddies outta carson they are a skott park piru click. also all poly hoods do not get along with the ese hoods.
just how the blacks and ese's war in l.a. same thing with the poly's and ese's

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Unread post by MICK » July 13th, 2005, 7:04 am

Thanks for that info brother.

The gang you were in, Royal Samoan Posse, is that a crip or blood set, or just an individual samoan gang?

UmanH-ay

Unread post by UmanH-ay » July 13th, 2005, 7:32 am

DC wrote:Mick, google the words "Boo Yaa Tribe" and have a look at photos that come up. These guys are Samoans from LA and are rappers and ex gangbangers. The way to tell the difference between a Samoan and a Tongan is by hair and skin tone. Samoans have straight hair whilst Tongans have more curly afro type hair, and generally Tongans are darker in skin colour. I work with alot of these guys and they are big dudes. Another thing is Samoans generally bang Blood whereas Tongans bang Crip, eg TCG (Tongan Crip Gang) and Samoan Warriors Bounty Hunters (Bloods).

DC


Samoans and Tongans both have curly hair, i myself a samoan though have straight hair, And yes Tongans are darker but most people cant tell the difference.

UmanH-ay

Unread post by UmanH-ay » July 13th, 2005, 7:39 am

On Average Tongans are bigger than samoans

Oh and heres a pic which is quite famous over the internet.

[img]http://img304.imageshack.us/img304/3453/cripsint5so.jpg[/img]

The Park village compton crips, the pic was taken just before the L.A riots errupted , as you can see there is a samoan member at the front showing his forearms.

UmanH-ay

Unread post by UmanH-ay » July 13th, 2005, 7:53 am

Oh and by the way if ya'll forgot

David Tua is samoan

[img]http://img304.imageshack.us/img304/1971/tuaman6532cm.jpg[/img]

I know a number of people who mistook the boo yaa tribe for being mexican because of their skin colour and hair style,most samoans i know have darker skin than the Boo yaa Tribe

Oh and by the way Boo Yaa Tribe are not american samoan,they are western samoan like David Tua is

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Unread post by MICK » July 13th, 2005, 7:56 am

^ yea, Ive seen that pic. I didnt know that guy in the middle was samoan.


What was the song by Boo Yaa Tribe where in the video they are on a stage and there is fire behind and infront of them?

UmanH-ay

Unread post by UmanH-ay » July 13th, 2005, 7:58 am

damn i forgot the name of it, but i know which one your on about.

This the only pic i could find of Tongans, this was taken at the Pasifika Festival last year, the Pasifika festival attracts 200,000 people comin from Fijians,samoans,Tongans,Tahians,Kiribati,maoris, Rarotongans(or cook islanders)

[img]http://img304.imageshack.us/img304/4844/tongans17io.jpg[/img]
Last edited by UmanH-ay on July 13th, 2005, 8:06 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Unread post by MICK » July 13th, 2005, 8:01 am

David Tua is a good fighter. I thought he was Hawaiian. hahaha

Can you give me a few lyrics from that song so I can run a search? That sh*t is pretty cool. Its like a rock song.

UmanH-ay

Unread post by UmanH-ay » July 13th, 2005, 8:07 am

Hmm yeah but a lot of their older sh*t was mixed with heavy metal so now im a bit confused which one it was, could of been "angry samoans"

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Unread post by MICK » July 13th, 2005, 8:10 am

fistfullofboomstick told me that it was from a soundtrack. The name was something like "bloodhead"

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Unread post by Sentenza » July 13th, 2005, 8:50 am

you forgot W/S Karson Piru, the set all but one of the B.Y.T. members were in. The other one was from Park Village and according to "Monster Kody" was holding the prison record for weightlifting in LA for a long time (so you can imagine what he looks like).
Another cousin of Boo Yaa Tribe was supreme Sumo champion in Japan aswell.
Seems like they are born to fight.

@mick: do you mean "another body murdered" ? they have a whole metal cd out (angry samoans) which is quite cool.
to me Boo Yaa Tribe is one of the best groups out there, cause they are doing every style (metal, funk, gangsta, even reggea) and they are doin it very good.

and by the way, they did a song with eminem on the west koasta nostra album, maybe thats why you always found his name.

i think even though they look hispanic to you, they are more asian than anything else, like all polynesians.

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Unread post by Tyrant » July 13th, 2005, 12:32 pm

Catalyst wrote:On Average Tongans are bigger than samoans

Oh and heres a pic which is quite famous over the internet.

[img]http://img304.imageshack.us/img304/3453/cripsint5so.jpg[/img]

The Park village compton crips, the pic was taken just before the L.A riots errupted , as you can see there is a samoan member at the front showing his forearms.

that samoan guy in the middle looks like he's blakc
the david guy looks like he's laos or cambodian

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Unread post by 100 » July 13th, 2005, 1:14 pm

Catalyst wrote:Oh and by the way if ya'll forgot

David Tua is samoan

[img]http://img304.imageshack.us/img304/1971/tuaman6532cm.jpg[/img]

I know a number of people who mistook the boo yaa tribe for being mexican because of their skin colour and hair style,most samoans i know have darker skin than the Boo yaa Tribe

Oh and by the way Boo Yaa Tribe are not american samoan,they are western samoan like David Tua is



MANY I HOPE YOU JOKING? SO MEXICANS WEAR BRAIDS AND PIGTAILS LIKE BOO YA TRIBE?

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Unread post by PREACH » July 13th, 2005, 1:24 pm

that is a crip set.

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