Gangs In The UK

There has been an increase in gang and youth groups in many Western European cities that have seen an influx of immigrants. There is also a significant organized crime coming from Eastern Europe In this section discuss Austria [Österreich], Denmark [ Danmark], England, France [FRANSS], Finland, Germany [Deutschland], Greece [Ελληνική, Elliniki], Ireland, Italy [italiana], Netherlands [Nederland], Norway [Norge], Rossiyskaya], Scotland, Spain [España] Sweden [Sverige] and the UK including any place on the Western European continent.
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Noog
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Unread postby Noog » September 22nd, 2006, 4:11 am

Special report: gun violence in Britain

Sunday September 3, 2006
The Observer


The last of the day's commuters were still trudging home when the hit took place. Around the corner from where Tony Blair once lived, a pedestrian was shot in the leg at point-blank range. The gunmen roared off on a motorbike, leaving their victim haemorrhaging onto the pavement in Queensbridge Road. Last Thursday's attack was never reported in the media. In truth it was nothing extraordinary; just another shooting, another night in Hackney, east London.
Who shot whom remains a mystery, but acting detective chief superintendent Kevin Davis, head of Scotland Yard's Operation Trident, which tackles black-on-black shootings, would be forgiven for deducing the gunmen have yet to celebrate their 20th birthday; they might have yet to finish their GCSEs. For, a fortnight after taking over Trident, Davis has already identified his greatest concern: schoolchildren.

Latest intelligence warns of a generation of teenagers who, barely out of primary school, risk becoming immersed in gun crime, an issue that has risen up the agenda to become the second biggest headache for law enforcement agencies after terrorism. This month Trident will launch a new campaign, titled '11-16,' targeting schools and youth groups for the first time.

'We have identified a trend for more teenagers carrying and using guns than ever before. Clearly this situation is unacceptable and a cause for concern. The bottom line is that a small minority of young people think it is more socially and morally acceptable to carry guns,' said Davis.

But the motives for murder have never seemed more mundane. The frequency of flower-festooned lampposts amid inner city estates is a reminder that life has become terrifyingly cheap in the toughest urban enclaves.

Davis blames a new generation of British-born gunmen who have developed a notion of 'disrespect' that justifies shooting over the smallest squabble. Murders can occur with a sang froid that has stunned the most experienced of homicide detectives. 'Offenders are using firearms over trivial disputes like arguments over spilt drinks, bumping into one another or minor road collisions,' said Davis.

More than 30 firearms offences occur every day, according to latest Home Office figures, with a record 10,990 incidents a year in England and Wales - more than double the total at the end of the Nineties. Police forces throughout the UK agree that this is largely due to the growing problem with teenagers carrying guns. Police in Nottingham, which was once known as 'assassination city', admitted that they were fearful a new generation would come through to fill a power vacuum after gang leaders were jailed.

In London eight teenagers have been charged on shooting offences during the past year. Recent cases include a 19-year-old shot in the chest and a 16-year-old who was targeted in a London park. Five weeks ago, Jason Greene began his day as usual by taking his two young boys to school. He never made it. By 8.30am the boys' uniforms were splattered with their father's blood after he was shot in a quiet north-west London street. The man who has been charged with the murder turned 18 a fortnight ago.

When police investigate gun crimes, drugs are usually the first motive they consider. New statistics this week will show that the inextricable link between drugs and firearms is unlikely to disappear in the near future. The DrugScope annual survey will confirm that overall national street prices for illicit drugs have again fallen, the surest indicator that current government policies are failing to stem the amount of narcotics peddled by gangs.

Ecstasy pills are down to barely more than the cost of a pint of milk, 50p, in some cities. The popularity of the horse tranquilliser and party drug ketamine continues to grow with prices dropping as low as £15 a gram in some cities, half the average UK cost. The cost of cocaine too continues to fall with £35 enough to buy a gram in certain cities, particularly those in the north east. Drugs and guns, it seems, will always remain natural bedfellows. Hours before last Thursday's shooting, police recovered £1m of cocaine in three south London homes. Officers expressed little surprise that loaded firearms and a silencer were among the stash.

No one knows how many guns are in circulation across Britain. Senior police sources confirm that they are 'easy and quick' to obtain. Whether they rent, borrow or buy, young men have no difficulty getting 'tooled up'. Semi-automatic pistols remain the weapon of choice, although Trident officers admit 'military hardware' has found its way onto the streets.

Elsewhere, thousands of AK-47s from east Europe are reported to have 'gone missing' in Britain. One senior police source admits halting the supply of weaponry into Britain remains a thankless task: 'We suspect a number enter the UK via lorry drivers using secret compartments. The issue is that we're concentrating on drug and human imports and yet bringing in a handful of guns is, relatively, dead easy.'

Once within the UK, firearms are moved about with ease. Recent tests on one firearm found it had been used in shootings in Bristol, London and Nottingham. The gun that killed PC Sharon Beshenivsky when she was called to a Bradford robbery last November may have been carried throughout Britain. Yet although shootings of police officers are rising, Scotland Yard say they remain at under 10 a year.

There are some signs of hope. Nottingham was once infamous for the frequency of its gangland executions but is now emerging as a city that proves proof that perhaps gun crime can be beaten. Since 2002, 1,300 residents have been arrested and £13m of drugs seized in connection with its gangland culture. There have been just four shootings in Nottingham so far this year; none was fatal. Police are cautiously hoping 2006 could be the first year in the city's recent history that no one will be shot dead. However, one police officer said: 'We are not offering odds on Nottinghamshire making it through the year without a fatal shooting, in this game there are no guarantees.'

First, however, the fear factor must be eradicated. Gun crime remains largely confined to small pockets of inner cities. Two-thirds of the shootings investigated by Operation Trident officers occured in just six of the capital's poorest boroughs. Three-quarters of shooting victims remain black. Intimidation is rife, retribution a promise. Davis admits protecting the entire extended family of a witness is impossible. Relatives living in Jamaica have been threatened following a murder in central London.

Dozens of people gawped in horror as teenagers Letisha Shakespeare and Charlene Ellis were shot dead in Birmingham in January 2003. Yet no one would admit to having seen it happen when police made their first inquiries. Posters appealing for witnesses were ripped down. There have also been notable victories. Last month, west London gangster Joel Smith was sentenced to life imprisonment for shooting seven-year-old Toni-Ann Byfield in the back at close range. Others came forward to testify and Smith was caught.

Operation Trident's latest internal research has collated an offending profile for career criminals as young as 11. The well-documented but largely unexplained educational failure of some black families, the lack of a father figure, poverty and, crucially, exclusion from school are identified as inspiring teenage gunmen. 'That can be the critical point. We all want to belong,' said Davis. Some join gangs like the Haggerston Crew, modelled on US gangs whose members are drawn from a small network of streets. But among the 160 or so gangs recently identified in shootings are Albanian, Turkish and white organised crime syndicates.

The truth behind the Queensbridge Road shooting may never emerge. But sooner or later there will be another. Maybe a shooting like that last September when a mother, holding a baby at a christening party, was shot dead. Three teenagers - aged 16, 17 and 14 - have been charged with her murder. Police fear the next gunman could be even younger.

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Unread postby Noog » September 29th, 2006, 8:27 am

Hitman shoots teenagers at McDonald's in broad daylight

29.09.06



Shooting scene: Brixton McDonald's
Two teenagers have been shot in a McDonald's restaurant.

A man walked up to a queue in the crowded fast-food eatery yesterday, pulled out a handgun and shot the boys. Children screamed as the man opened fire without warning at tea-time in Brixton, south London.

The teenagers are in a stable condition in hospital, police said.

The attacker, described as a 6ft 1in black man, then fled, leaving the teenagers lying injured on the floor.

Police today appealed for witnesses and information about the shooting at 5.30pm in the McDonald's at the junction of Brixton Road and Coldharbour Lane.

Officers from Operation Trident, which investigates gun crime in the black community, were at the scene.

Detective Constable Luis Martinez said: "The venue was very busy at the time of the shooting and those present, including families with young children, were shocked and terrified by this violent attack.

"We have only a brief description of the gunman at present but if anyone saw the incident or the suspect making off, we need to hear from you."

Police said the suspect ran down Rushcroft Road and into Saltoun Road, heading towards Railton Road.

It is unclear whether the teenagers, both believed to be 17 years old, were customers at the restaurant. But a McDonald's spokeswoman said the youths had "not been queueing" at the till at the time of the incident.

Amanda Pierce said: "Officers have reviewed the CCTV footage and confirmed that the two victims had been popping in and out of the restaurant."

Witnesses today described the scenes of horror inside the restaurant. One said he thought a bomb had exploded as dozens of people, including schoolchildren and women carrying babies, ran screaming from the fast-food outlet.

The 33-year-old Streatham resident - a Lambeth Council employee - said, moments earlier, he heard at least one loud bang as he stood in the street outside, but thought little of it.

He said: "I was crossing the road from Brixton Library towards McDonald's and the first thing I heard was a bang which I thought was nothing. "After a few seconds, I saw everybody rushing out of McDonald's screaming, some of them carrying small children, just in all directions. Some were turning left, some right, some crossing the road, just clearing the building.

The man added that he had worked in Brixton High Street for 10 years and the McDonald's restaurant is a popular after-school hang out for youngsters from at least three secondary schools.

He said he was aware of increased violence on at least three estates in the Brixton area in recent weeks.

He added that schoolchildren can be seen openly wearing gang symbols, including coloured headbands, in Brixton.

Steve Martin, a community leader who liaises between police and the black community, said he did not believe the incident was gang-related. He said: "I know a lot of people and I would have heard about it. I think the gunman knew the teenagers."

Mr Martin was five minutes from Brixton Road when the shooting took place. "I thought I might be able to help so I went over there," he said. "There weren't enough police at first, it was chaos. It was such a busy road, and traffic was being diverted so it was gridlock. Crowds started to gather on one side of the road. There were a lot of schoolchildren around, it was that time of day."

Another community leader, who refused to be named, said the gunman shot one teenager in the stomach first, and his friend then went over to help him.

He said: "It was at this point that the gunman shot the second boy in the arm."

Police said they were still investigating the shooting and would reveal more information at a press conference. Detectives from Operation Trident, which investigates black gun crime, were at the scene on Thursday night and appealed for witnesses to come forward.

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Unread postby niro » September 29th, 2006, 1:58 pm

yea i heard bout that brixton shooting

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Unread postby londonpride » September 29th, 2006, 5:30 pm

'Triad' revenge attack outside nightclubSep 26 2006







A LEADING nightclub could be closed after two revellers were gunned down outside in a suspected Triad revenge attack.

The victims - both south-east Asian men - were sprayed with bullets as they emerged from the Fridge in the early hours of yesterday.

They were taken to hospital in a serious condition but medics expected them to recover.

Detectives believe the shooting was sparked by a row inside the Brixton nightspot - hosting an Asian-themed party - which spilled into the street.

Furious police chiefs will demand an explanation from the club's management in the coming days - and have not ruled out closing the popular venue.




Story continues

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The Fridge is already on its "last warning" after cops made a major swoop on drug dealers operating inside earlier this year.


They closed the club in April for a month and only allowed bosses to reopen when they agreed to a stringent set of security measures,including sniffer dogs and the installation of metal detectors to weed out guns and knives.


Acting Superintendent Dave Musker told the South London Press that protecting clubbers was paramount.


He said: "We will be speaking to the management in the coming days about the running of the evening and to explore what went on.


"If any proscriptive action is needed, we will not hesitate to take it - and this includes reviewing the club's licence."


The gunmen struck as revellers emerged into the street shortly before 5am.


The two victims were cut down in a hail of bullets before their attacker fled on foot.


Sources said the shooting was probably the work of armed Triad gangsters.


One man was treated by paramedics while the other was given first aid by a club medic.


They were both said to be in a "serious but stable" condition as we went to press.


A police spokeswoman said: "We must retain an open mind as to the motive at this stage."


Police said 60 revellers were inside at the time.


Chris Thornhill, managing director of operations at the Fridge, said: "There was a ruckus, not a big fight.


"Our security evicted the people. Those people then crossed the road.

http://icsouthlondon.icnetwork.co.uk/01 ... _page.html

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Unread postby londonpride » September 29th, 2006, 5:35 pm

A DESPERATE hunt for witnesses has begun after a man was gunned down in the middle of a busy nightclub.

Daniel Ross, 22, was shot in the head in the Scala nightclub in King's Cross, at about 3.45am on Sunday.

He was rushed to University College Hospital but died that night.

CCTV footage shows Mr Ross, from Kilburn, entering the club at about 1am. He was on the dance floor in the middle level of the club near the DJ cage when the shots were fired.

The lights were switched on as soon as the shots were heard and hundreds of people panicked and fled the venue through fire exits before the police arrived.

A 24-year-old man, who was only a couple of metres away from the victim when he was shot, said: "The music was playing and I was looking up at the stage when there was this popping noise.

"It sounded like someone had let off one of those party poppers but I looked round and saw this guy lying on the floor.

"He had been shot in the head and his girlfriend was screaming and trying to help him but everyone else just started legging it.

"I can't understand how someone got a gun past the metal detectors - it's unbelievable."

Police officers reckon there were between 850 to 1,000 people in the club at the time of the murder but so far only two witnesses have come forward.

The shooting is being investigated by Scotland Yard's Operation Trident team, which specialises in black on black gun crime.

http://www.islingtongazette.co.uk/conte ... 3A26%3A657

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Unread postby Hydro2oo6 » September 29th, 2006, 5:56 pm

theres been alot of shootins in moss side in manchester lately, it seems to be heatin up around there again alot lately between dottington n gooch it seems

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Unread postby Noog » September 30th, 2006, 1:18 pm

GANGS OF BRITAIN


By Peter Walsh


Walsh is author of GANG WAR: The Inside Story of the Manchester Gangs and one of the authors of the book Cocky, about British drug baron Curtis Warren.


THE NURSES and orderlies at Manchester Royal Infirmary have witnessed a few punch-ups over the years. But nothing had prepared them for the sight of two armed gangs chasing each other on mountain bikes down the hospital corridors. As staff tried bravely to barricade doors and protect patients, members of the Gooch Close Gang and the rival Longsight Crew hunted each other through the wards, the X-ray department and the fracture clinic. CCTV cameras caught the thugs, masked in hoods, balaclavas and bandanas, using hospital trolleys as battering rams to try to reach parts of the building. The storming of the city’s main hospital, in July last year, followed several incidents earlier that day. A member of each gang had been taken to hospital with gunshot wounds, while another Goochie, Leon Johnson, had been mown down in a hit-and-run attack. Each was being visited by relatives and friends when word spread that the others were in the hospital, and the Longsight thugs phoned for back-up. "The arrival of the second group caused panic,” said prosecutor Robert Elias at a subsequent trial. “Staff, patients and visitors fled for their lives." Ten young men were later jailed for either affray or public order offences. ‘A hospital should be a sanctuary,’ said one exasperated detective, ‘not an arena in which to settle violent disputes.’ Yet the fact that such a brazen display should happen in Manchester’s main accident and emergency hospital came as little surprise. And twelve months later, in July 2005, they were at it again: the Gooch and Doddington gangs fighting hand-to-hand and loosing off gunshots in Manchester city centre at 2.30 on a Wednesday afternoon. The truth is, Britain is in the midst of a gang epidemic.


As late as five years ago, most British police forces would deny they had a gang problem. Now it seems senior officers are almost falling over themselves to claim ‘my patch is worse than yours’. A retiring Merseyside Chief Constable said Liverpool was unique for the reach of its criminal gangs, particularly in drug importation and distribution. The head of Nottinghamshire Police says his force is ‘reeling with murders’ and cannot cope. The Metropolitan Police this summer identified at least 193 criminal networks in the capital alone, ranging from international cartels to undisciplined street crews. So who are these groups, how numerous are they and where have they come from? The precise number of ‘gangs’ in the UK is unknowable and ever-changing. Compile a chart and it’s out of date within a week, as different groups wax and wane with startling speed. Some researchers also distinguish between ‘crime firms’ and ‘street gangs’. The former come together purely to commit crimes, while the latter may offer social and psychological succour and engage in a range of activities as well as crime.


Everyone agrees, though, that they are here, they are deadly, and they are growing. When academics from the University of Glamorgan studied data from interviews with almost 5,000 arrestees across England and Wales, they found that 15% had either current or past experience as gang members. This suggests there may be 20,000 active gang members across the nation – and that’s just among adults aged 17 and over. Of course, gangs are nothing new in the UK. One particular kind of mob culture was actually pioneered here: football hooliganism. Every town with a professional soccer club has its hoolie firm, but they have tended to be classed as disorderly thugs rather than criminal enterprises, even though they are monitored by the National Criminal Intelligence Service. Some hooligans entered the rave scene in the late 1980s, as organisers, ecstasy dealers and security teams, but still the police viewed them as a rung below the breed of hardcore ‘gangsta’ that had begun to appear.


The new breed was propelled by the growing availability of two commodities, drugs and guns. London and Manchester were the first cities to feel their heat. The headline-making conflict that saw Manchester labelled ‘Britain’s Chicago’ erupted in the mid-80s between the volatile armed robbers of Cheetham Hill, north of the city centre, and the frontline drug dealers of Moss Side, to the south. It was followed by an internal war within Moss Side itself, leading to such pointless killings as the murder of schoolboy Benji Stanley. At the time, Manchester’s problems were almost unique – but times were changing. In 1991, Lancashire Chief Constable Brian Johnson told the Association of Chief Police Officers that murderous gangs were fighting to control the drugs traffic in Britain. So powerful were they, and so well armed, that they threatened to steamroller the specialist police units tasked with taking them on. His words had the edge of truth, yet organised crime remained a dirty phrase in British law enforcement. As a senior Liverpool detective told one criminologist, ‘We put organised crime in a box marked, “Do not open, too difficult to handle”.’ Eventually that lid could be held on no longer, and Pandora’s Box blew open. Liverpool’s mid-90s gang war between the white clans of inner-city Dingle and the black lads of Granby was a foretaste of internecine feuds in several cities. The late 90s saw the arrival of such lethal weaponry as the MAC-10, a rapid-fire submachine gun designed for jungle warfare. It soon became a favourite accessory, supplied from former Eastern Bloc countries or by unscrupulous gun dealers who reactivated decommissioned models. One young gang leader, the wheelchair-bound Julian Bell of the Longsight Crew, used his £500,000 compensation from a motorbike accident to buy the guns and body armour to fight the neighbouring Pitt Bull Crew.


The trend in the new millennium is for the more powerful urban crews to deliberately encroach into nearby cities. Sheffield is the most glaring example. The Steel City had a thriving club and drug scene but no gangland culture. Outside mobs saw easy pickings and muscled in on drug dealers working alone without protection. The recklessly violent Doddington Gang from Manchester appeared there, as did the St Ann’s Crew from Nottingham, one of that city’s three main black gangs. After some of their members were ambushed in a Sheffield takeaway and taxed of jewellery and mobile phones, the St Ann’s lads swore revenge. A hit squad returned in a convoy of cars with a shotgun and blasted to death an innocent father-of-seven, 42-year-old Gerald Smith, as he stood in the doorway of Donkeyman’s Afro Caribbean club in Spital Hill. The tragic irony is that the gang who had mugged the St Ann’s men were not locals but members of yet another outside mob: the infamous Johnson Crew, from Birmingham. “The real background was territorial control and power of rival gangs of young men in Midlands cities,’ said Mr Justice Wakerley, jailing nine St Ann’s men for a total of 195 years for Smith’s murder. ‘You were part of a gang that was ready, by the use of force or firearms, to show your dominance – that you were kings.’ The killers responded with laughter and jeers. Several similar murders in Sheffield prompted South Yorkshire Police to launch Operation Maple. ‘It became evident that criminal gangs from places such as Manchester, Nottingham, Birmingham and London were infiltrating the area by meeting women, becoming entrenched in society and intimidating the area's own criminals,’ said Detective Inspector Andy Bishop. ‘Robberies, shootings, kidnappings, reports of torture and even murders became linked with these gangs and the drugs trade. They identified criminals they saw as easy targets and it got to the point where the violence [was] becoming a huge drain on police resources.’ Since Maple began, officers have seized almost £2 million worth of drugs, including crack cocaine, of heroin, ecstasy and cannabis, and recovered more than 20 guns. One of their biggest successes was the capture of drug dealer Keisha Williams, aged 23, with £30,000 of crack cocaine. Williams fronted a massive dealing operation from a subway for a Jamaican drugs baron believed to be heavily involved in gun crime.


The West Indian involvement has been key to the spread of gangs in many UK cities. A 2003 report suggested Jamaican Yardies had invaded Britain at an ‘alarming rate’ and their control of the crack trade had gradually spread north, reaching as far as Aberdeen. Of 43 police forces in England and Wales, 36 reported a problem with Yardie gangs. Yet despite their almost insane brutality, the Yardies have not always fared well against home-grown rivals. In Birmingham, Jamaican interlopers were faced down by the ‘homeboys’ of Handsworth and Lozells: the Burger Bar Boys and the Johnson Crew. The Burgers and the Johnnies, however, then turned their guns on each other in a tit-for-tat spiral, culminating in the tragic killing of Charlene Ellis and Letisha Shakespeare at a New Year’s Day party. Far from cowing the gangs, such high-profile incidents seem only to heighten their bravado. The Birmingham gangsters have even made and distributed DVDs of their exploits. Leeds was relatively free of gang violence until the murder of towering gangster Clifton ‘Junior’ Bryan in 2000. Having survived at least one previous assassination bid, Bryan was apparently lured to a house in Manchester with another man, Denis Wilson, and shot in the head. Their bodies were then bundled into the trunk of a car, which was later found abandoned in the Harehills district of Leeds. Bryan’s young acolytes, known as The Youth, or Yout’, were then faced with competition from an influx of Jamaican drug sellers, The resultant bloodbath led to the launching Operation Stirrup, which began in 2001 and is now a permanent police campaign against the gangs.


In London, the term ‘Yardie’ has become so ubiquitous as to mean almost any Jamaican, African or black gang. These include the Cartel Crew in Brixton, the Lock City Crew and their rival Much Love Crew in Harlesden, the Spanglers and the Fireblade in north-east London, the Kinglands Crew and the Hackney Posse in the east, the Ghetto Boys in Lewisham, and the Peckham Boys and Younger Peckham Boys. Then there are the Muslim Boys, the name used by between 50 and 100 members of several gangs in neighbourhoods around Brixton, Peckham, Lambeth, and Streatham, south London. Many of them have access to automatic and semi-automatic weapons and Detective Chief Superintendent John Coles, who heads Operation Trident, the Scotland Yard unit that targets gun crime in the black community, blames them for several murders, attempted murders, and a series of robberies. ‘They began using the name Muslim Boys as a macho thing,’ Mr Coles told the London Evening Standard. ‘One or two might have converted to Islam, but it's nothing to do with religion, or terrorism. As far as I'm concerned they're the same thugs, engaged in the same crimes, whatever they can do to make money.’ Ethnic crime groups are heavily represented in London, easily the nation’s biggest and most cosmopolitan city – though it should be noted that the Glamorgan University researchers found most gang members were white.


London Turks and Kurds control much of the heroin importation to the UK, and occasionally their feuds break out into open warfare, as in the infamous Battle of Green Lanes, when 40 men armed with guns, knives and baseball bats battled outside a social club. By the time police arrived, 21 men had been injured, one fatally. ‘It is family controlled and for years it has remained covert,’ said a senior Metropolitan Police officer of the Turkish heroin trade. “It is extremely powerful, controlled more from Istanbul than London.’


Outside the major urban centres, gang problems are less acute, but growing. Youngsters from the flatlands of East Anglia to the council estates of Paisley are adopting the street slang, wearing the clothes, selling drugs and even acquiring guns. The gang leaders are usually childhood friends, brought up in poor areas, searching for the elusive quality of ‘respect’ – which in their world often equates as fear. If the criminal world is a layer cake, at the bottom are teenage gangs with members as young as ten, based on housing estates. Members may then graduate to more serious crime gangs, stealing high-value cars, snatching jewellery and watches, dealing wraps of crack and heroin. On the next level are villains who control large-scale operations such as drug distribution – the so-called ‘ten-kilo’ men, and protection rackets on pubs, clubs and bars. At the very top are the big drug importers and moneymen: the Turks, the Asians, the Colombians, and a few indigenous mini-cartels, mainly from London and the Home Counties or Liverpool. Some of these crime groups have political links in their countries of origin. What know single grup has ever done is achieve representation at every level – until now. For some time, Customs officer have been watching a surge in the wealth and influence of Asian gangs, particularly from Pakistan and India. Often fuelled by anti-Western sentiment, they are smart, savvy and ruthless. ‘They control the entire heroin supply chain from cultivation in the Middle east to sale on the streets of the UK,’ said one investigator. ‘No other crime group can do that, it makes them uniquely powerful. And that’s frightening.’



GANG MAP


NATIONAL


Many foreign gangs are active across the UK. They include: Chinese Triads (estimated 5,000 nationwide), engaged in loansharking, extortion, gambling, fraud; Snakehead and Vietnamese gangs (350), people smuggling, extortion; Turkish and Kurdish gangs (500-1,000), heroin importation, arms; Nigerian and Ghanaian gangs (1,000), fraud; Balkan and former Eastern Bloc gangs (unknown), prostitution, drugs, guns, contract killing (Serbs), smuggling illegal immigrants; former Communist Bloc - trading in women for vice and pornography, extortion, importing counterfeit goods.


BIRMINGHAM


Two black gangs, the Burger Bar Boys and the Johnson Crew, have waged an on-off war for a decade. Both grew out of earlier gangs, the Handsworth Nigga Squad and the Inch High Crew, and bizarrely took their names from the food outlets where they hung out. They have forged contacts with outside firms including the PDC in London, the Gooch in Manchester and others in Bristol and Swindon New gangs are Badder Bar Boys, the Champagne Crew and the Rally Close Crew. Members of Birmingham City’s Zulus football firm control many of the pub and club doors in the city and are treated with respect by the younger gangbangers.


BRISTOL


A crack cocaine hotspot. The Aggi crew, who take their name form the initials of their founder members, dominated the cities drug trade until key members were jailed,. When they emerged form prison, they faced opposition from Yardie posses including Hype Cru, the Moutain View Posse and the Back to back gang. Predictably, a spate of shootings and even an attack qwith giant fireworks followed. Police set up Operation Atrium to prevent gang warfare and closed down the Black and White Café in St Paul’s, the most notorious drug-dealing venue in England. Recently they also shut crackhouses in South Gloucestershire and one in Somerset. But the murder of enforcer Stephen Henry in September 2003 indicates that gang conflict in the city has not gone away.


LONDON


The capital has multiple layers of gang/organised crime, from international cartels to school-age street urchins. Turks and Kurds, many linked to the notorious Baybasin clan, control heroin importation. They included the Bombers in Hackney (100 members), the Tottenham Boys (70), and the Kurdish Bulldogs (70) in Wood Green Muslim Boys is the name used by between 50 and 100 members of several gangs around Brixton, Peckham, Lambeth, and Streatham, in south London. Most are in their late teens or early 20s and belong to the Stockwell Crew, the South Man Syndicate and Poverty Driven Children (PDC). At least 20 hardcore members are in jail. The Peckham Boys are primarily active in Peckham, Walworth and Camberwell, and in cross-border disputes. Members are predominately black males involved in robbery, house burglary, drugs and disorder. Older members often move into more serious crimes. Their offshoot, the Young Peckham Boys, were blamed for the death of 10-year-old Damilola Taylor The Lock City Crew tend to be foreign born, either African or Jamaican, while their rival Much Love Crew are local to north London. White gangs include the tough Canning Town and Stratford firms in the East End, and the notorious A Team from north London. Rival Sri Lankan gangs have recently waged a vicious war in the Wembley area, while the Southall Sikhs (formerly the Holy Smokes and Tooti Nung) are active in the heroin trade.


LUTON


The gradual demise of the Asian Bury Park Youth Posse left the territory clear for their long-time rivals the Men In Gear (MIGs), one of the first multi-racial football hooligan crews, who number about 100 strong.


MANCHESTER


For two decades the dominant force in the city’s underworld, the Salford Lads are several different firms linked by long-standing friendships. Up to 100-strong, they specialise in cannabis and club drugs, protection rackets and armed robbery. The 60-strong Cheetham Hillbillies, many of African descent, specialised in armed robbery, taxing and drugs. Some became multi-millionaire drug barons. The Gooch, from Moss Side, are now the strongest of the black or mixed-race gangs. Their alleged ‘godmother’, a woman of 46, was recently subject to an ASBO. Their Doddington rivals have been decimated by murders, an internal split, and successful police operations, including one that rounded up over a dozen of their street drug dealers.


The Longsight Crew survive despite the recent jailing of their leader, Julian Bell, while the Pitt Bull Crew, who split off from the Doddington, were all but wiped out by the jailing of their entire leadership, including boss Tommy Pitt, sentenced to life imprisonment for murder. New groups such as the Young Longsight Soldiers, but it is the emerging Asian gangs that may dominate the city’s underworld in the future.


LIVERPOOL


Originally run by a small number of powerful families, the city’s organised crime culture is entrepreneurial rather than territorial. The most famous Merseyside Mr Big, Curtis Warren, the Toxteth scally who became Britain’s biggest drugs baron, is currently in jail in Holland, serving a 12-year sentence for masterminding a £125m shipment. He forged links with major narcotics suppliers such as the Colombians, as did John Haase, whose Big Brother Security was a front for his drug and weapons deals with Turkish godfathers. The city now has innumerable drug dealing cells with links across the globe, while the heavies behind the city’s door security industry are in a constant state of tension that occasionally breaks out in violence. At street level, police now say there are now at least three young gangs on Warren’s former Toxteth turf, while two young white gangs have been locked in a deadly conflict in the Kirkdale area of the city.


LEEDS


The 6ft 5in Clifton Junior Bryan had strong links with the drug warlords of Manchester and Liverpool, in 2000. When he and the equally powerful Frank “Gatt” Birley died in unrelated incidents, it unleashed a spate of shootings has hit the city after his death, attributable to the so-called Yout’ (Youth) clashing with Yardies for control of the drugs trade. Left six dead andmore than twenty injured and led to the deportation of over 200 illegal entrants, mainly from the West Indies, in a police crackdown called Operation Stirrup. Leeds is also home of one of Britain’s few female crime gangs, the Chapeltown Purse Dippers.


NOTTINGHAM


Three predominantly black gangs, the Meadows Posse, the St Ann’s Crew and the Radford Road Posse, but they are challenged by white guys from the Bestwood area Their numbers vary depending on how many are in jail or on the run at any one time. Robberies and drug dealing are their stock in trade. They have links with black gangs in Birmingham, Sheffield and Manchester.


NEWCASTLE AND THE NORTH-EAST


Traditionally the preserve of musclemen and bodybuilders, the macho culture of the north-east has been personified by tough families such as the Sayers and the Conroys (Newcastle), the late Lee Duffy (Middlesbrough), the Warden Law Gang (Sunderland) and BOSS – the Boys of South Shields – and their offshoot the Youth of South Shields. The north-east does not have the large ethnic minority gangs of many other urban areas, nor has it yet fully adopted the gun culture. Violent gangs like the Stockton Wrecking Crew and the Gremlins are little more than brawlers compared to the more organised gangs of other cities.

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Unread postby Noog » September 30th, 2006, 1:31 pm

The life and death of a 'gangsta'
Last updated at 23:18pm on 26th June 2006




Alex Mulamba poses with a shotgun. He was a member of the Man Dem Crew (above)


The image was one of the most haunting sights of recent weeks. Fifteen-year-old Alex Mulumba - the victim of a stabbing in a London street - lies in a hospital bed, a ventilator tube protruding from his mouth.

So shocked was Alex’s father, Kamondo, at seeing his son in this condition that he decided to release the picture. ‘He was a good boy who wasn’t in any gang,’ his father said. Shortly after the picture was taken, Alex was dead.

Contrast the picture of Alex in hospital with that of a young, masked boy crouching with a pump-action shotgun that appeared on a website belonging to a south London gang. They are of the same boy.

His father may have known nothing of Alex’s secret life but a Daily Mail investigation has found that, far from being innocent, he was another victim of the destructive gang culture in Britain’s inner cities.

When he was out with his friends, Alex called himself Tiny Alien and was a member of a gang set up 18 months ago by half a dozen black boys from a south London estate. They each had nicknames and called themselves the Man Dem Crew.

All were under the age of 16, but the gang members - Tooth, Smacks, S-Man, Drowzie, Stemz and Tiny Alien - liked to think they were big, hard, streetwise men. Brought up on an unrelenting diet of ‘gangsta rap’ music and violent video games, they tried their hardest to dress the part and talk the talk.

The gang founded a website, with quotes, language and photographs, to foster their hard image. ‘Holding it down in dirty south, keepin’ it wid dem dirty hoes and makin’ it large,’ the website boasts, alongside photographs of boys posing menacingly with hooded tops and baseball caps worn back to front, and fingers splayed in the shape of an imaginary handgun pointing towards the camera.

In other photos, they pose with a gun, a prop to further accentuate their ‘gangster’ credentials. So contrived are the images that it would be easy to think that the Man Dem Crew website is a spoof - a tongue-in-cheek homage to the cult television character Ali G.

But the sad truth is that while these young teenagers may have started off playing a part, trying to boost their appeal and credibility by acting as if they are street-wise ‘hoods’, they became sucked into the terrifying reality of the world they were trying to ape - a world of gangs, guns, drugs, violence and tragically, in this case, death.

Alex was stabbed through the heart with a samurai sword. While two brothers, Adu, 18, and Nana Sarpong, 20, have been charged with his murder, there are suggestions that his death was preceded by a vicious fight involving up to 40 youths.

What exactly happened will be left for a jury to decide but the killing has raised searching questions about the involvement of ever-younger boys in violent gangs.

Often lacking positive role models at home and adrift in a sub-culture built around instant gratification through drugs, sex and crime, it would appear that youngsters are being increasingly manipulated by older, more established criminal gangs whose respect they are trying to earn.

These youngsters are used as runners to carry drugs and guns, and are drawn into a world that initially seems attractive but rapidly turns out to be extremely dangerous.

‘If they are lucky, by the age of 30 they will be in prison,’ said a senior detective from Operation Trident, the Scotland Yard unit that targets gun crime in the black community. ‘If they’re not, they’ll be dead.’

When Alex Mulumba left his family’s second-floor council flat next to the Oval Cricket Ground in south London at 6pm earlier this month, it was to celebrate finishing his GCSE exams.

His father Kamondo told him not to go out, to wait for him to go with him, but Alex went all the same and they spoke again at about 11pm. ‘I’m coming home, I’m on the bus,’ 15-year-old Alex told him.

It was the last time they would ever speak. ‘Not long after, my other son called me,’ Mr Mulumba, 48, a father-of-six, later explained. ‘A friend of Alex’s had called him. He told me Alex had been stabbed and said: “Can you come out?” He said Alex was in St Thomas’s Hospital.

‘I went straight to the hospital and I’d been there for ten minutes when a nurse told me they had tried their best but my son wasn’t alive any more.’

Alex’s death made national headlines, coming during the Government’s knife amnesty and in the week that Tory leader David Cameron hit out at Radio 1 for playing rap music glamorising knife and gun crime.

The family took the agonising decision to release the photo of Alex dying in hospital to highlight the dangers of the weapon-carrying culture as well as the terrible waste of Alex’s life.

'He loved music'

Mr Mulumba told reporters: ‘Alex loved music and was doing his exams at school. He wanted to go to college and do electrical engineering. He was a lovely boy with lots of friends.’ Yet the photographs of Alex calling himself Tiny Alien and posturing with his fellow gang members on the Man Dem Crew website are there for everyone to see.

In one group shot, the teenagers pose in the heart of their ‘turf’, draped around a road sign, Vassall Road, a quarter of a mile from the dead boy’s flat. Then there is the picture of Alex pointing the shotgun at the camera.

The website could, of course, be nothing more than a case of ‘boys being boys’, showing off to their friends. But the text on the site does its best to dispel this notion and even emphasises - in gangsta rap language - that the shotgun is real (‘the shottie is a rebore’ and ‘the shottie aint borrowed’).

The site claims the boys have access to other guns (‘for legal reasons we cant put the magnum o the baby nine on the site’ - a magnum is a powerful handgun and the ‘baby nine’ slang for a 9mm weapon).

Then there is the fact that Alex was facing charges of robbery, theft and violence, and last September two fellow gang members Falco Moludi and Ipaon Mosengo were convicted of a shocking crime spree.

Both aged 15, they are currently serving a total of six-and-a-half years in prison for robbery. They targeted school playgrounds dressed in masks and balaclavas.

Copying their tactics from gangster films and rap music videos, they forced their victims to line up, and then frisked them for mobile phones and other valuables.

If their prey did not co-operate they resorted to violence. One 16-year-old boy needed hospital treatment after being punched and kicked. Another suffered a broken jaw. On one occasion, Moludi even pulled out an imitation handgun that he had been hiding in a small Gucci bag. Not content with that, they bragged of their crimes on their website. Over a three-month period, the pair are believed to have committed a staggering 35 offences.

When they were caught, one school sent an entire minibus-load of pupils to identify them in a police line-up - while the judge who sentenced them for robbery commented that so widespread was their crime spree that their victims thought it ‘normal’ to have their possessions stolen.

Moludi and Mosengo failed to show even the faintest hint of remorse. When they were jailed, Mosengo fashioned his fingers into the shape of a gun, pointed at the investigating officer and shouted: ‘Two bullets. Bang! Bang! You’re dead.’ So the Man Dem Crew was not just a testosterone-charged front - it was an active gang committing violent crimes in south London. According to police sources, the teenagers took the gang’s name from an established Yardie gang in Tottenham, north London.

New gangs

One senior detective told the Mail that new gangs of young teenagers are proliferating across London and that the influence of the established gangs they look up to is such that they turn to crime with alarming speed.

Established gangs, dominated by older youths and men, rely increasingly on children as young as 11 and 12 - often siblings of established gang members - as runners to carry drugs or guns. Not only does this protect the older criminals, but it also acts as a way of recruiting and indoctrinating the next generation of gang members.

‘The worrying thing is that in the past it would just be the bad kids who would join gangs,’ says the detective. ‘That is changing now - the influence of the gang culture is spreading and is increasingly hard to resist.’

It is a point that Kate Hoey, the Labour MP for Vauxhall, whose constituency contains the site of Alex’s murder, echoes. ‘Gang members are no longer just feral kids. Now gangs are extracting kids from stable families who go to school and pass their exams. Then, outside the home and school, there is a real breakdown and they join these dreadful gangs,’ she says.

Indeed, while Moludi and Mosengo met at a pupil referral unit after being excluded from school, it appears that Alex’s family background was more stable. Alex’s father is still at a loss to know how his son turned from a churchgoing, well-behaved child into a violent gang member.

He said he had pleaded with his son not to get involved with gang culture and that he had let him down by not protecting him from the dangers around him. ‘So many people here carry weapons, it’s not a safe place to live,’ he said.

Children brought up in deprived areas where weapons are common are easily persuaded that criminality is a means to an end — whether gaining respect from their peer group or achieving material success.

‘A lot of these kids come into contact with older gang members,’ says the source at the police’s Operation Trident. ‘Their parents are often law-abiding, and I know of parents who even search their children for guns and drugs when they come home at night. But short of keeping them inside all the time, what more can they do?

‘A lot of these youngsters don’t want to get involved but they are subjected to physical violence or threatened with firearms by the established gangs.

‘These older gang members don’t want to get their hands dirty. They don’t want to get caught with the drugs. They would rather make a phone call to have their gun delivered to them as and when they need it, rather than carry it around and face five years in prison.’

Among the established gangs in south London, the best-known are the Peel Dem Crew (in Brixton), the Ghetto Boys (Deptford), the Peckham Boys (Peckham), South Man Syndicate (Tooting, Streatham, Thornton Heath) and the Muslim Boys (Brixton).

They live off the proceeds of crack cocaine and heroin, often stolen from other dealers and sold on. Indeed, the number of shootings in London is said to be directly related to the amount of cocaine available on the streets. When supply runs dry as the result of a major customs bust, dealers steal drugs from rival dealers and confrontations soar accordingly.

Of all the major gangs, the one currently causing most concern is the Muslim Boys. It has a reputation as the most heavily armed and ruthless, and has been responsible for at least two execution-style murders, as well as scores of robberies and attempted murders.

Opinion is divided over the role of religion in their activities. Reports have surfaced of gangs conducting the forced conversions of rival gang members and of prayers being said before and after robberies.

Others claim the gang has nothing to do with Islam and that the name was chosen in the wake of 9/11 to inspire fear. Its members are also said to have found that as Muslims they were treated better and given higher quality meals in prison.

Whatever the case, the stark truth is that gang culture has so penetrated the inner cities that many young children now believe that membership offers security: it is better to be in than out. Take, for example, the Dark Side Soldiers, a six-strong, Brixton-based gang of youngsters aged 14 to 19. Beef, the gang’s ringleader, says they all routinely carry knives because it is the only way to protect one another.

‘It might seem to you “Wow, a knife” but to me it’s part of life,’ he says. ‘It’s normal. I need one in case someone is carrying a knife and they come up to me in the street or on a bus.

‘They might see me talking to a girl and think they can get my phone. There are people out there with no honour, people who draw knives in a fist fight.’

He says he stabbed someone once in the leg, but doesn’t think it killed him. Not that he particularly cares. ‘If he died I wouldn’t think about it because he was willing to end my life,’ he says. ‘The streets are a war zone and I do what I do to survive.’ The tragedy is that this sort of attitude only perpetuates the cycle of violence. Alex Mulumba thought he was one of those ‘survivors’ - instead he died before he had even reached the age of 16.

SPOOKY1_SURX3.

Unread postby SPOOKY1_SURX3. » October 6th, 2006, 6:58 pm

lol;

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Unread postby LEEDSBANGBANG » October 8th, 2006, 1:39 pm

wats funny

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Street heroin sales in London and nearby areas

Unread postby theBlackMeow » November 7th, 2006, 3:42 pm

[/quote]
Hydro2006
LONDON

The capital has multiple layers of gang/organised crime, from international cartels to school-age street urchins. Turks and Kurds, many linked to the notorious Baybasin clan, control heroin importation. They included the Bombers in Hackney (100 members), the Tottenham Boys (70), and the Kurdish Bulldogs (70) in Wood Green Muslim Boys is the name used by between 50 and 100 members of several gangs around Brixton, Peckham, Lambeth, and Streatham, in south London. Most are in their late teens or early 20s and belong to the Stockwell Crew, the South Man Syndicate and Poverty Driven Children (PDC). At least 20 hardcore members are in jail. The Peckham Boys are primarily active in Peckham, Walworth and Camberwell, and in cross-border disputes. Members are predominately black males involved in robbery, house burglary, drugs and disorder. Older members often move into more serious crimes. Their offshoot, the Young Peckham Boys, were blamed for the death of 10-year-old Damilola Taylor The Lock City Crew tend to be foreign born, either African or Jamaican, while their rival Much Love Crew are local to north London. White gangs include the tough Canning Town and Stratford firms in the East End, and the notorious A Team from north London. Rival Sri Lankan gangs have recently waged a vicious war in the Wembley area, while the Southall Sikhs (formerly the Holy Smokes and Tooti Nung) are active in the heroin trade.

[/quote]

Being from the other side of the world and having no experience with the way heroin is trafficked in England, let me ask you which gang/posse/etc in London sells the highest quality heroin, and what is the average per cent purity of street heroin? Where I live, the Mexicans deal in this godawful garbage that looks like something you scraped off of a telephone pole, causes massive infections and is probably less than 15% pure. Back east, in New york City and Baltimore, on the other hand, you can buy heroin that is up to 70% pure, but in very tiny packages. It's usually Colombian smack, although the best stuff comes from the triads and Chinese/SE Asian gangs. They don't sell on the street, though.[/quote]

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Unread postby Jazza » November 7th, 2006, 6:42 pm

Glasgow Gangs
glaswegian gangs are mostly young teenagers from ages of 11 through to 18 although older members may be up to around 26. It is rare for most gangs to use guns, however they do use firearms such as air rifles, crossbows, etc. Much more commonplace are blades such as lockbacks, switchblades, razors, machettes, replica samurai swords, butcher knifes etc. (and before you say anything these are all commonly used!). a much loved weapon is the Spring billy, or spring cosh.

Someone has already mentioned alot of the gang names, but you have missed out the west glasgow gangs, sure the some of the areas are not quite as ruff (although most are! drumchapel and maryhill for example), but alot of the gangs are just as violent.

Maryhill:
Young Skitzo Lindale
Valley Young Team
Cadder Young Team
Young Maryhill Fleeto
Young Georges Xross
Young Trossachs Street
Achre Boyz
Blairdardie/Anniesland/Knightswood:
Young Partick Fleeto
Anniesland Casuals / Young Anniesland Casuals
Young Knightswood Fleeto
Young Temple Scurvy / Temple Boyz
Young Skitzo Dardie Boyz / Dardie Boyz
Shafton Young Team Ok / SYTO

G61-G62 + Clydebank
Young Mullguy Derry / Young Mull Scheme Teem
Courthill Young Team
Young Kessy Boys
Young Wessy Caldy
--
Young Clydebank Bundy
Whitecrook
Yoker Toi
Young Gowdy Boys
Faifley Young Team

Many teams have bitter rivalries with the nearest team to their area.
others are united as members may go to the same schools, or hang about & fight together against other teams.
Many young teams are used by drug dealers to defend territories or to collect debts, or enforce authority, many others are paid to attack certain people. As they nearly always fight in large groups, in hand to hand combat, many come away with very serious injuries. Especially because of the deep-rooted and famous knife-culture in young teenagers (and adults, mind you) in glasgow.

Ive lived here all my life and I fought in one of the young teams mentioned above, trust me, many people from other places in britain couldnt understand what its like here, sure we dont have big gun problems here, but id rather be shot with a gun than get stabbed in the stomach with a machette again! - and I was lucky, it was a "shallow cut".
The other thing is, here, a gang isnt just a handfull of people, its pretty much every young person in the whole council area (equivalent to estates in england, except in glasgow they are areas).
Hope that makes sense, im not used to typing (or speaking) in non-glaswegian, but you wouldnt understand me if i did!

CATCH YEEZ EFTER TROOPZ!

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Unread postby LEEDSBANGBANG » November 8th, 2006, 6:05 am

nice info jazza, my mate moved dwn from glasgow and was in the greenhil young team or sumat, r they hard or pussyboyz? and my other mate moved down from easterhouse wats that like? tar mate

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Unread postby Qdawg » November 10th, 2006, 12:52 am

them boys in london was acting a fool for weeks fighting for what they believed in @starting fires,riots..etc....thats good though

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Unread postby Jazza » November 10th, 2006, 7:58 am

not sure bout greenhill.. but easterhoose is pretty much as ruff as it gets.. ask him where abouts, and if he knows about the Easterhoose Aggro, ive got family in that gang..

Ask them what they think about the difference between leeds and glasgow, a few of my mates live in london now and they say that london's fuck all compared to glasgow!

GLASGOW BOIZ RUNNIN IT.. ON TOP NON STOP.. !

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Unread postby LEEDSBANGBANG » November 10th, 2006, 9:03 am

Ye mate, i asked one ov em. and he ses glasgow a lot ruffer, and theres loads of stabbings n big mad brawls, but he ses he thinks robberys will be more down here, fuck knows tho doubt it. he ses theres sum tough ppl up there.

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Unread postby LEEDSBANGBANG » November 10th, 2006, 9:05 am

do alot of ppl from glasgow move down ere, cos i know of about 7 people round my area from glasgow

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Unread postby niro » November 10th, 2006, 4:14 pm

Jazza wrote:not sure bout greenhill.. but easterhoose is pretty much as ruff as it gets.. ask him where abouts, and if he knows about the Easterhoose Aggro, ive got family in that gang..

Ask them what they think about the difference between leeds and glasgow, a few of my mates live in london now and they say that london's fu-- all compared to glasgow!

GLASGOW BOIZ RUNNIN IT.. ON TOP NON STOP.. !


all depends on the areas

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Unread postby Jakk » December 16th, 2006, 8:22 am

there is a few links for all you peeps that dout what its like out here in the UK

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gangs_in_England

http://www.centreforcitizenship.org/ukimage.html

http://gangsinlondon.piczo.com/?cr=2&rfm=y

http://gangsinmanchester.piczo.com/?cr=2&rfm=y

http://www.bbc.co.uk/manchester/have_your_say/2003/01/06/gangs.shtml

I ain't proud of these things but it has to be stated to make you yanks and that understand it ain't all Tea and Crumpets

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Unread postby Jinky » December 18th, 2006, 6:24 pm

JAZZA WERE ABOOTS YE FAE M8 ? AM FAE CALTON AVE GOT FAMILY IN EASTERHOOSE ANAW, BAL TOI !

CYE EFTER M8

TONGS YA BASS

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Unread postby Jinky » December 18th, 2006, 6:25 pm

NEVER HEARD OF GREENHILL, GREENFIELD MAYBE ? IF SO THEY AINT ALL THAT :)

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Unread postby Jinky » December 18th, 2006, 6:26 pm

JAZZA, MARYHILL IS IN THE NORTH IM SURE

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Re: Gangs In The UK

Unread postby peterparker2 » October 28th, 2008, 12:14 pm

Paul Doyle.Who is he? A nobody.....

A man started him off in business,took from being a punch drunk nobody doorman and gave a stepping stone to greater things!

A man called john morris or morrison i think....

Hes on his toes in spain due to doyley turning grass against him....

I strongly believe this morris topped Doyles partner! graham boardman another bully doorman.R:I:P...........

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Re: Gangs In The UK

Unread postby tusabes » June 16th, 2009, 1:25 am

peterparker2 wrote:Paul Doyle.Who is he? A nobody.....

A man started him off in business,took from being a punch drunk nobody doorman and gave a stepping stone to greater things!

A man called john morris or morrison i think....

Hes on his toes in spain due to doyley turning grass against him....

I strongly believe this morris topped Doyles partner! graham boardman another bully doorman.R:I:P...........


if this doyle is from manchester then the morris you talk of was a driver and a good friend to paul massey . he was well known but i havent heard anything about him in a long time.

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Re: Gangs In The UK

Unread postby doyle » June 28th, 2009, 2:56 pm

Hi i have just joined so i can answere a question,I am the wife of Paul Doyle (one punch) yes he is orignally from salford.I was just wondering why somebody wanted to know his where about's is and if you would like me to pass a message on to him for you?.Please let me know i am sure paul would be happy to help you with anything you want to know.
Thanks MRS J DOYLE

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Re: Gangs In The UK

Unread postby doyle » June 28th, 2009, 3:13 pm

just seen what mr peter parker wrote! how dare you call my husband a nobody!!! you nothing boy!! as for being punchdrunk...where on earth did you hear that? would you be so brave as to say it to his face??.And yes! MORRISEY did kill paul's friend grayham.So Mr Parker..i would advise you to keep your gob shut!! when you really dont have a clue about either of these people.Paul is a very respectable man liked by many people.You really have all your infomation wrong! Morrisy wasn't grassed up for 1,and he was certainly! NOT a friend of paul massey's to my knolage.Get the facts right first!!

Mrs Doyle

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Re: Gangs In The UK

Unread postby minimac360 » June 30th, 2009, 9:52 am

ive noticed that a lot of the stuff posted on this forum is bollocks to be quite frank. one guy has supposedly listed british gansg in which most of them where football hooligan firms and a lot of false imformation has been posted also.

Paul Doyle is a salford gangster and asociate of the better known paul massey. They are part of a large group of different interlocking white salford gangs which are known as the 'Salford lads' they rose during the early eighties and became renowned for their love of fighting and where all hard as nails which made them feared by a lot of the other salford and manchester gangs. Paul Massey was labled salfords 'Mr Big and was the figure head of this group which specialised in protection, fraud and even some overseas laundering and counterfeiting interests. Paul Doyle was even more of a fierce fighter than Massey who stood little over 5'8, Doyle was a large neck less man with a stocky build who was at one time a hot prospect in the boxing world, labled 'one punch' for the amount of time that he had knocked people out with just one punch. This group of salford lads grew up together and where a large group and where more a very dangerous group of friends than the stereotypical image of a gang, Massey spent a large portion of the eighties behind bars for a string of offenses such as assaulting police officers and possessing counterfeit money, and was convicted of stabbing a man outside a manchester night club whilst being filmed for a documentary and was jailed in 1999 for this offence. he is still seen to have a very strong grip on the salford and manchester gangs and still manages to direct the salford lads from 'inside'

: some manchester gangs which where not mentioned:

1. Pepperhill mob. Moss side. lead by delroy brown.
2. Hillbillies . Cheetam hill. lead by 'white' tony johnson until he was executed outisde the penny black pub in manchester

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Re: Gangs In The UK

Unread postby minimac360 » June 30th, 2009, 9:58 am

haha i noteced that nobody seemed to make any more posts talking negatively about paul massey or paul doyle since his wife came on here. plucking information out of thin air. these are VERY dangerous men.

and if you realy are pauls doyles wife then much respect to your husband and his associates

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Re: Gangs In The UK

Unread postby SOUFLONDON » June 30th, 2009, 11:30 am

minimac360 wrote:haha i noteced that nobody seemed to make any more posts talking negatively about paul massey or paul doyle since his wife came on here. plucking information out of thin air. these are VERY dangerous men.

and if you realy are pauls doyles wife then much respect to your husband and his associates



I honestly thought that was Bwoy dem

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Re: Gangs In The UK

Unread postby doyle » July 1st, 2009, 2:53 pm

thanx minimax :) yees i am pauls wife,i told him about this post he just laughed,he did ask if they left a name but could had no idea who the person was when i told him the name.He has never heard of him, "it figurer's". ;) there sooooo! brave making shit up,do you agree?.Thank's for that mate..
Mrs J.Doyle

cliffard
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Re: Street heroin sales in London and nearby areas

Unread postby cliffard » July 1st, 2009, 3:01 pm

theBlackMeow wrote:

Hydro2006
LONDON

The capital has multiple layers of gang/organised crime, from international cartels to school-age street urchins. Turks and Kurds, many linked to the notorious Baybasin clan, control heroin importation. They included the Bombers in Hackney (100 members), the Tottenham Boys (70), and the Kurdish Bulldogs (70) in Wood Green Muslim Boys is the name used by between 50 and 100 members of several gangs around Brixton, Peckham, Lambeth, and Streatham, in south London. Most are in their late teens or early 20s and belong to the Stockwell Crew, the South Man Syndicate and Poverty Driven Children (PDC). At least 20 hardcore members are in jail. The Peckham Boys are primarily active in Peckham, Walworth and Camberwell, and in cross-border disputes. Members are predominately black males involved in robbery, house burglary, drugs and disorder. Older members often move into more serious crimes. Their offshoot, the Young Peckham Boys, were blamed for the death of 10-year-old Damilola Taylor The Lock City Crew tend to be foreign born, either African or Jamaican, while their rival Much Love Crew are local to north London. White gangs include the tough Canning Town and Stratford firms in the East End, and the notorious A Team from north London. Rival Sri Lankan gangs have recently waged a vicious war in the Wembley area, while the Southall Sikhs (formerly the Holy Smokes and Tooti Nung) are active in the heroin trade.

[/quote]

Being from the other side of the world and having no experience with the way heroin is trafficked in England, let me ask you which gang/posse/etc in London sells the highest quality heroin, and what is the average per cent purity of street heroin? Where I live, the Mexicans deal in this godawful garbage that looks like something you scraped off of a telephone pole, causes massive infections and is probably less than 15% pure. Back east, in New york City and Baltimore, on the other hand, you can buy heroin that is up to 70% pure, but in very tiny packages. It's usually Colombian smack, although the best stuff comes from the triads and Chinese/SE Asian gangs. They don't sell on the street, though.[/quote][/quote]

black meow we get brown heroin straight from afghanistan its no.3 not no.4 like the white chinese stuff on the east coast its brown in colour and it melts into a brown blob which is easy to chase on the foil however i believe its better than the mexican tar you get on the west coast

dinky
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Re: Gangs In The UK

Unread postby dinky » July 4th, 2009, 6:34 am

doyle wrote:thanx minimax :) yees i am pauls wife,i told him about this post he just laughed,he did ask if they left a name but could had no idea who the person was when i told him the name.He has never heard of him, "it figurer's". ;) there sooooo! brave making shit up,do you agree?.Thank's for that mate..
Mrs J.Doyle

Its the usual scenario people slaggin others off they dont know,i know massey is well respected in the northwest, i dont know enough bout your husband to have an opinion,but at least you can refute any rubbish thats written about him on here.


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